Tuesday, January 31, 2017

Soup's On
National Soup Month


Soup is a combination of foods with endless possibilities. It represents comfort, warmth, tradition and nourishment.

Soups can be an economical way of meeting nutritional needs. Leftovers are perfect when preparing soups.

Soups have been known to curb the appetite and slow down the eating process. Studies show slower eaters are more likely to notice signs of fullness sooner and consume fewer calories. With the extra time, enjoy the flavor, aroma and texture of the foods.

Soups can be prepared with a wide variety of healthy ingredients and traditional favorites made healthier with some substitutions.
 

Wisconsin Beer Cheese Soup

To put my food science background to the test, Jan Norris, a food writer and journalist sent me a "Wisconsin Beer Cheese Soup" recipe. Jan and I have worked together for many years and she often challenges me to make a recipe healthier. The original recipe is located at Jan Norris: Food and Florida.

Jan states “Don’t go with any recipe for beer-cheese soup if it’s not from Wisconsin, where beer and cheese rule the culinary world." This is a favorite for superbowl parties.

Original Nutrition Analysis: 577 Calories; 46 gm Fat; 27 gm Saturated Fat; 144 mg Cholesterol; and 818 mg Sodium.

Modified Wisconsin Beer Cheese Soup: 266 Calories; 16 gm Fat; 8 gm Saturated Fat; 41 mg Cholesterol; and 522 mg Sodium. The recipe is still high in fats and sodium, but by making some small changes, we were able to save 311 Calories; 30 gm Fat; 19 gm Saturated Fat; 103 mg Cholesterol; and 296 mg Sodium. The soup makes for a filling main course and perfect for those cold winter days.

Modified Wisconsin Beer Cheese Soup, serves 14, 1 cup =
1- 1/2 cups diced carrots
1- 1/2 cups diced onion
1 -1/2 cups diced celery
2 cloves garlic, minced
Dash (or to taste) hot pepper sauce
1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
3 cups low sodium chicken broth
2 cups beer
1/3 cup margarine, unsalted
1/3 cup flour
4 cups 2%milk
6 cups reduced-fat shredded extra-sharp Cheddar cheese
1 tablespoon Dijon or spicy mustard
2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce
1 teaspoon dry mustard
popped popcorn, for topping

In a large saucepan over medium heat, mix carrots, onion, celery, and garlic. Stir in hot pepper sauce, cayenne pepper and pepper. Pour in chicken broth and beer; simmer until vegetables are tender, about 12 minutes. Remove from heat.

Meanwhile, heat margarine in a large soup pot over medium-high heat. Stir in flour with a wire whisk; cook, stirring until the flour is light brown, about 3 or 4 minutes. Gradually stir in milk, whisking to prevent scorching, until thickened. Remove from heat, and gradually stir in cheese. Keep warm. Stir beer mixture into cheese mixture. Stir in Dijon mustard, Worcestershire sauce and dry mustard. Adjust for hot pepper sauce. Bring to a simmer, and cook 10 minutes. Serve topped with popcorn.

Jan Norris is a journalist and food writer. She spent 26 years at The Palm Beach Post, 21 years as editor of the weekly Food and Dining section. Jan’s blog is full of food, travel, Old Florida, the South and a world of people with stories to tell.

Foods you can substitute to make heart healthy choices.
Instead of:
 Try these heart healthy suggestions:
whole milk or 2% milk1% milk or skim milk
whipped creamchilled evaporated skim milk, whipped
cheese, (American, Cheddar, Swiss)Cheeses with 5 or less grams of fat per ounce. Terms used: reduced-fat, low-fat or fat-free. Reduced-fat is easier to substitute when cooking.
creamed cottage cheesenonfat or 1% fat cottage cheese, or farmers cheese
cream cheeselight, fat-free products, or Neufchatel cheese
Mozzarella cheesepart-skim mozzarella cheese
Ricotta cheesenonfat, lite, or part-skim
sour cream, regularnon-fat, light, or low fat sour cream or plain yogurt.
butterlower calorie margarines in soft tubes, vegetable cooking sprays, or nonstick cookware.
margarine, regularlower calorie margarines in soft tubes, vegetable cooking sprays, or nonstick cookware.
mayonnaise, regularreduced-fat, cholesterol free, low fat, or fat free. If making a dip you can substitute plain nonfat or low fat yogurt. Reduce the amount required in the recipe.
salad dressingreduced-fat, cholesterol free, low fat, or fat free dressings or lemon juice, vinegar, or mustard. Reduce the amount required in the recipe.
one whole eggequals 2 egg whites or 1/4 cup egg substitute
egg noodlesnoodles made without egg yolk
condensed cream soup99% fat-free condensed cream soup
salteliminate or reduce by 1/2; explore herbs and spices
gravygravies made with low sodium broth and thickened with flour/cornstarch
beef, pork, veal, lambchoose lean cuts trimmed of all visible fat, or substitute with chicken or turkey without the skin.
oil for sautéingwater, broth, tomato juice
fryingbroil, bake, microwave, poach, steam, grill, stir fry

Healthy Soup Additions
1. Instead of salt, add herbs and spices to enhance the flavor. Explore the many possible seasonings available.
2. Increase fiber, vitamins and minerals by adding fresh, frozen or leftover vegetables (use fruits if making a cold soup). Avoid canned vegetables high in sodium. Read the label. A low sodium food contains 140 mg or less per serving of sodium.
3. Increase fiber and protein by using foods such as, beans, lentils, brown rice, whole grain pasta, barley and bulgur.
4. Increase calcium and protein by using skim milk, evaporated skim milk, non-fat dry milk powder, or calcium-fortified soymilk. These low fat ingredients can replace the higher fat alternatives like whole milk or cream.

Canned and Dry Soup Mixes are known for their high sodium content, Read the label and check the serving size. Remember, a low sodium food contains 140 mg or less per serving of sodium.

There are some companies within the food industry making great strides in lowering the sodium content in their products. At Campbell,  they have more than 100 products with a healthy level of sodium; more than 200 that are low in fat and saturated fat; more than 150 products that have 100 calories or less per serving; and more than 85 products certified by the American Heart Association.


As I searched the Campbell archives, I came across a commercial from 1959. Campbell had the foresight to recognize the importance of nutrition over 50 years ago.


Campbell's Soup, 1959


Soup Tidbits
Soup is a stable in almost every American home. After the NBC's "Seinfeld" show introduced the "Soup Nazi" in the United States on November 2, 1995 - Soup became a fashionable food.

The Soup Nazi - Revenge

Resources
Over 40 Healthy Soup Recipes from the Mayo Clinic.

Monday, January 30, 2017

January 30, National Croissant Day - Croissant Sandwich with Tabouli, Tomatoes, and Feta Cheese





Croissant Sandwich with Tabouli,
Tomatoes, and Feta Cheese

Serves One

Ingredients

1 Croissant (1 ounce)
1 Tbsp Tabouli Salad
2 slices Tomatoes
1/2 oz Feta Cheese

Nutrition Information


Nutritional Analysis Services


Ensure accurate and cost effective nutritional analysis and food nutrition facts labels for your recipes and menus utilizing an extensive research database. A great service for the Media, Cookbook Publishers, Writers, Chefs, Recipe Websites and Blogs. Your readers will enjoy and benefit from the Nutrition information.

For more information, visit Dietitians-Online Nutritional Analysis Services
contact: Sandra Frank, Ed.D, RDN, LN, FAND recipenews@gmail.com
954-796-7235




Sunday, January 29, 2017

January 29, National Corn Chip Day



Each portion of food equals 60 calories
Dips: Salsa (10 kcal/Tbsp) and Fat free Ranch Dressing (15 kcal/Tbsp)


Nutritional Analysis Services

Ensure accurate and cost effective nutritional analysis and food nutrition facts labels for your recipes and menus utilizing an extensive research database. A great service for the Media, Cookbook Publishers, Writers, Chefs, Recipe Websites and Blogs. Your readers will enjoy and benefit from the Nutrition information.

For more information, visit Dietitians-Online Nutritional Analysis Services

contact:
Sandra Frank, Ed.D, RDN, LN, FAND
recipenews@gmail.com
954-796-7235



Saturday, January 28, 2017

January 28, National Blueberry Pancake Day

Blueberry Pancakes with Fresh Blueberries

Serves One
Ingredients
2 Blueberry Pancakes, frozen
1/3 cup Fresh Blueberries


Nutrition Information


Nutritional Analysis Services

Ensure accurate and cost effective nutritional analysis and food nutrition facts labels for your recipes and menus utilizing an extensive research database. A great service for the Media, Cookbook Publishers, Writers, Chefs, Recipe Websites and Blogs. Your readers will enjoy and benefit from the Nutrition information.

For more information, visit Dietitians-Online Nutritional Analysis Services

contact:
Sandra Frank, Ed.D, RDN, LN
recipenews@gmail.com
954-796-7235

Friday, January 27, 2017

January 27, National Chocolate Cake Day

Chocolate cake is a cake flavored with melted chocolate or cocoa powder. The history of chocolate cake goes back to 1764, when Dr. James Baker discovered how to make chocolate by grinding cocoa beans between two massive circular millstones. from Wikipedia

Double Chocolate Pound Cakes Slices, Sara Lee®

Allergen Statement:
Contains wheat, eggs, milk and soy


Ingredients: Sugar, enriched bleached flour (wheat flour, niacin, iron, thiamin mononitrate, riboflavin, folic acid), soybean oil, eggs, water, high fructose corn syrup, milk chocolate [sugar, cocoa butter, milk, chocolate liquor, soy lecithin, vanillin (artificial flavor)], corn syrup, skim milk, cocoa processed with alkali, modified corn starch, glycerin. Contains 2% or less of each of the following: caramel color, leavening (sodium aluminum phosphate, baking soda, monocalcium phosphate), corn starch, natural and artificial flavors, natural cocoa extract, mono- and diglycerides, salt, potassium sorbate (preservative), gums (xanthan, gellan), wheat starch, soy lecithin, soy flour.

Nutrition Information

The Double Chocolate Pound Cakes Slices made by Sara Lee® is not the best choice. It has far too many artificial ingredients and additives; and lacks significant nutrients.

Try EatingWell, Chocolate Decadence
Chocolate Decadence Recipe

Per serving: 164 calories; 6 g fat ( 3 g sat , 0 g mono ); 35 mg cholesterol; 29 g carbohydrates; 23 g added sugars; 3 g protein; 2 g fiber; 49 mg sodium; 92 mg potassium.


Thursday, January 26, 2017

January 26, National Peanut Brittle Day


Peanut Brittle is a type of confection consisting of flat broken pieces of hard sugar candy embedded with peanuts. 

A mixture of sugar and water is heated to the hard crack stage and to a temperature of approximately 300 °F (149 °C). Some recipes call for ingredients such as corn syrup and salt in the first step. Peanuts are mixed with the caramelized sugar. At this point spices, leavening agents, and often peanut butter or butter are added. The hot candy is poured out onto a flat surface for cooling, traditionally a granite or marble slab. The hot candy may be troweled to uniform thickness. When the brittle cools, it is broken into pieces. -  from Wikipedia

Making Peanut Brittle







Wednesday, January 25, 2017

January, National Oatmeal Month

Oatmeal is ground oat groats or porridge made from oats. Oatmeal can also be ground oats, steel-cut oats, crushed oats, or rolled oats.

Health Benefits
Consumption of oatmeal is known to help lower blood cholesterol because of its soluble fiber content. The popularity of oatmeal and oat products increased after January 1997 when the Food and Drug Administration allowed labels to claim it may reduce the risk of heart disease when combined with a low-fat diet.


Nutrition Information
Ingredients
3/4 cup Oatmeal, cooked
1/3 cup Raspberries

Steel Cut Oatmeal: Healthy Snack Ideas
St. Louis Children's Hospital




Resources and References
1. Wikipedia: Oatmeal
2. WebMD: 
Heartier Benefits Seen From Oatmeal





Nutritional Analysis Services

Ensure accurate and cost effective nutritional analysis and food nutrition facts labels for your recipes and menus utilizing an extensive research database. A great service for the Media, Cookbook Publishers, Writers, Chefs, Recipe Websites and Blogs. Your readers will enjoy and benefit from the Nutrition information.

For more information, visit Dietitians-Online Nutritional Analysis Services

contact:
Sandra Frank, Ed.D, RDN, LN
recipenews@gmail.com
954-796-7235



Monday, January 23, 2017

Fiber Focus Month


Dietary fibers are found naturally in the plants we eat. They are either soluble (dissolves in water) or insoluble (does not dissolve in water, so they pass through the gastrointestinal tract relatively intact). Both types of fiber are important for health, digestion, and preventing conditions such as heart disease, diabetes, obesity, diverticulitis, and constipation.

Health Benefits
1. Fiber may aid in the prevention of heart disease by lowering your cholesterol.
2. Fiber helps control blood sugar levels for people with diabetes.
3. Adequate amounts of fiber from foods can help prevent constipation and hemorrhoids.
4. A high-fiber eating plan is lower in calories and tends to make you feel full faster.

Recommendation
The recommended daily amount of fiber is 25 grams for women and 38 grams for men. After age 50, the daily fiber needs drops to 21 grams for women and 30 grams for men.

Food Sources
Sources of soluble fiber: oatmeal, oat cereal, lentils, apples, oranges, pears, oat bran, strawberries, nuts, flaxseeds, beans, dried peas, blueberries, cucumbers, and carrots.

Sources of insoluble fiber: whole wheat, whole grains, wheat bran, corn bran, seeds, nuts, barley, couscous, brown rice, bulgur, zucchini, celery, broccoli, cabbage, onions, tomatoes, carrots, cucumbers, green beans, dark leafy vegetables, raisins, grapes, fruit, and root vegetable skins.

Serving Ideas 
1. Include 2 cups of fresh fruits and 2 ½ cups of vegetables every day
2. Use whole grain breads and cereals 
3. Snack on fruits and vegetables
4. Include vegetables and beans in stews and casseroles
5. Add oats to meat loaf and breads
6. Add fruit to cereal
7. Include a salad with at least one meal per day

Kids 'n Fiber

Getting kids to eat the fiber they need can be a challenge. Join FDA dietitian, nutritionist, and mom Shirley Blakely and a group of hungry Kids in a kitchen for some good-tasting high fiber foods.





Liz Weiss, RD explains how your kids can make whole grain
choices at school and at home.


References
Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, What is Fiber?
WebMD, Dietary Fiber: Insoluble vs. Soluble



Ensure accurate and cost effective nutritional analysis for your recipes utilizing an extensive research database and over 25 years experience. A valuable service for the Recipe Blogger, Media, Cookbook Publishers, Writers, Chefs, and Recipe Websites. Your readers will benefit from the Nutrition information and a Registered Dietitian. Contact: Dietitians-Online.com; Sandra Frank, Ed.D, RDN, LN at recipenews@gmail.com

Sunday, January 22, 2017

January - National Birth Defects Prevention Month



 March of Dimes Report Card 

The health of babies in the United States has taken a step backward as the nation’s preterm birth rate worsened for the first time in eight years. According to the latest March of Dimes Premature Birth Report Card, the U.S. earned a “C” grade amidst widening differences in prematurity rates across different races and ethnicities.




Birth defects are common, costly, and critical. Birth defects affect 1 in every 33 babies born in the United States and are a leading cause of infant mortality. Babies who survive and live with birth defects are at increased risk for developing many lifelong physical, cognitive, and social challenges. Medical care and support services only scrape the surface of the financial and emotional impact of living with birth defects.



Prevent Birth Defects


National Birth Defects Prevention Month is a time to raise awareness of birth defects and promote healthy pregnancies.

A birth defect is a problem that happens while a baby is developing in the mother’s body. One out of every 33 babies in the United States is born with a birth defect.

Many birth defects can be prevented. If you are pregnant or planning to get pregnant, these tips can help you have a healthy pregnancy and a healthy baby:

* Take a multivitamin with folic acid every day before and during pregnancy.

* See your doctor or midwife regularly as soon as you think you're pregnant and throughout your pregnancy.

* Make sure your vaccinations are up to date.

* Eat well and stay active.

* Avoid alcohol, smoking, and other drug use.

* Prevent infections from food and other sources.

Healthy Lifestyle Choices

Diet and exercise
Eat healthy and exercise regularly. Health problems are linked to weighing too much or too little before and during pregnancy. Your health is affected by what you eat and by your physical activity.

Here are a few important guidelines for healthy eating:

• Eat lots of vegetables, fruits and whole grains such as whole wheat, oats, barley and brown rice. These are excellent sources of the vitamins, minerals and dietary fiber you need every day to feel your best.

• Eat less of the foods that are high in saturated fat and cholesterol, such as meat, poultry and whole milk dairy foods (low-fat dairy is okay). Saturated fat and cholesterol are strongly linked to heart disease, cancer and obesity.

Regular physical activity helps control weight, strengthen your heart, and give you more energy. It also reduces depression and relieves stress. It’s a good idea to exercise at least 3 times a week for at least 30 minutes.

Alcohol and drugs

Drinking alcohol or taking any type of legal or street drugs during the early weeks of pregnancy can hurt your unborn baby. That’s when the brain and other organs are forming.

If you drink alcohol, so does your unborn baby. Alcohol abuse during pregnay is a leading known cause of mental retardation. If you are considering a pregnancy, it’s best to stop drinking alcohol before you conceive.

Cocaine, crack, heroin, amphetamines and other street drugs can badly hurt your baby if you use them while you are pregnant. Your baby could suffer lifelong health problems. Get help to stop using drugs before you become pregnant and stay clean.









Saturday, January 21, 2017

National Granola Bar Day

Granola bars consist of granola pressed and baked into a bar shape, resulting in the production of a convenient snack. The product is most popular in the United States and Canada, Australia and New Zealand, the United Kingdom, parts of southern Europe, Brazil, Israel, South Africa and Japan. Recently, granola has begun to expand its market into India and other southeast Asian countries.

Recipe: EatingWell Granola Bar
12 servings



Ingredients
  • 1 cup lightly salted dry-roasted peanuts, coarsely chopped
  • ½ cup crispy brown rice cereal
  • ½ cup old-fashioned or quick-cooking rolled oats
  • ⅓ cup sunflower seeds
  • ¼ cup dried blueberries
  • 6 dried apricots, diced
  • 3 tablespoons mini chocolate chips
  • 5 tablespoons brown rice syrup
Directions
Preheat oven to 325°F. Line the bottom and sides of an 8-inch-square baking pan with foil and coat with cooking spray.
  1. Combine peanuts, rice cereal, oats,  sunflower seeds, blueberries, apricots and chocolate chips in a large bowl. Drizzle with syrup and gently stir until thoroughly combined. Spread in the prepared baking pan. Coat another piece of foil with cooking spray and place on the bar mixture, sprayed-side down. Place another pan on top and press firmly to compress the mixture. (Pressing before baking helps the bars hold together after baking.) Remove top pan and foil.
  2. Bake until just beginning to turn golden at the edges, 20 to 24 minutes (metal pan) or 30 to 35 minutes (glass pan). Cool in the pan on a wire rack for 10 minutes.
  3. Carefully lift the baked square out of the pan by holding the edges of the foil and place on a cutting board, leaving the foil underneath. Cut in half, then cut each half crosswise into 6 bars. Let cool completely before lifting the bars off the foil.
· Make Ahead Tip: Store airtight between sheets of wax paper for up to 1 week. Or individually wrap in plastic and freeze.
· People with celiac disease or gluten-sensitivity should use oats that are labeled “gluten-free,” as oats are often cross-contaminated with wheat and barley.

Resources
1. Good Housekeeping, 28 Healthy Granola Bars to Fuel Your Day



January 21, New England Clam Chowder Day


New England Clam Chowder
Yield: 4 servings
Serving Size: about 1 cup


Ingredients:

1 can Select Harvest New England Clam Chowder, 98% Fat free
2 cups fat-free, low sodium vegetable broth
Garnish each serving with
1 Tbsp Green Onions
1.5 Tbsp cooked Lentils
8 Oyster Crackers

Directions 
Combine New England Clam Chowder with low sodium vegetable broth. Heat to serving temperature. Garnish with green onions, cooked lentils, and oyster crackers.


Nutrition Information

Recipe Card

Modifying a Recipe to Meet Nutritional Needs.
Goals: 
1. Easy to prepare recipe (related to arthritis; difficulty cutting foods).
2. Lower Sodium (related to hypertension; family history). Canned soups are usually high in sodium. Used a low sodium vegetable broth to reduce the sodium in the chowder.
3. Increase Fiber (related to diverticulosis). Added cooked lentils.
4. Maintain calories around 100 calories per serving (related to weight control)
5. Easy to Chew (related to new dentures).  

6. Low in Cholesterol (related to history of elevated blood cholesterol; family history)


Friday, January 20, 2017

Healthy Weight Week Resources

In celebrating Healthy Weight Week, we looked at Weight Bias, Body Image, Self-Esteem, Lifelong Healthy Habits, Identifying Fad Diets and Beauty Comes in All Sizes and Shapes.


It is crucial to continue research and education. Eating disorder or disordered eating affects up to 24 million Americans and 70 million individuals worldwide.  (Renfrew Center Foundation for Eating Disorders, Eating Disorders 101 Guide: A Summary of Issues, Statistics and Resources, October 2003)

Anorexia is the 3rd most common chronic illness among adolescents. (Public Health Service's Office in Women's Health, Eating Disorder Information Sheet, 2000).

20% of people suffering from anorexia will prematurely die from complications related to their eating disorder, including suicide and heart problems. (Renfrew Center Foundation for Eating Disorders, "Eating Disorders 101 Guide: A Summary of Issues, Statistics and Resources," published September 2002, revised October 2003).

It is estimated currently 11% of high school students have been diagnosed with an eating disorder.
(National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders) 


Resources and Support


Healthy Weight Network provides information and resources pertaining to “health at any size”. Green Mountain at Fox Run, sponsor of Healthy Weight Week. Green Mountain at Fox Run is the country's first and oldest all-women's educational community for weight and health management. It is nationally recognized as an effective solution for ending struggles with eating and weight through the “non-diet” approach it pioneered.

National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA) provides education, resources and support for those individuals and families affected by eating disorders, and serves to prevent, cure and access quality care. NEDA sponsors events, programs and research on eating disorders, and contains a section on its site featuring recent news articles and information.

Academy for Eating Disorders (AED). The Academy for Eating Disorders aims to provide comprehensive information on the facts of eating disorders, treatment plans and education to prevent others from developing eating disorders.

Alliance of Eating Disorders Awareness was created as a source of community outreach, education, awareness and prevention of the various eating disorders. Their goal is to spread the message, recovery from these disorders is possible, and individuals should not have to suffer or recover alone.



Academy of Nutrition and DieteticsProvides nutrition resources about eating disorders, including an extensive nutrition reading list.

Obesity Society is the leading scientific society dedicated to the study of obesity. They are committed to encouraging research on the causes and treatment of obesity, and to keeping the medical community and public informed of new advances. AOA provides obesity awareness and prevention information.

Binge Eating Disorder Association (BEDA) is the national organization focusing on increased prevention, diagnosis, and treatment for Binge Eating Disorder.

Council on Size and Weight Discrimination, Inc. An activist group influencing public opinion and policy through education, information and networking.

Eating Disorders Anonymous (EDA). A 12 step self-help fellowship for anorexics and bulimics. EDA offers membership to any person who needs help recovering from an eating disorder. The site has meetings around the United States, publications, recovery information, EDA news and helpful links to other sites.

Eating Disorders Coalition.  The goal of Eating Disorders Coalition is to "advance the federal recognition of eating disorders as a public health priority." The nonprofit organization lists the federal policy on its website, congressional briefings, events, information/resources on eating disorders and a blog.

Eating Disorders Information Network (EDIN) is a nonprofit organization committed to the prevention of all types of disordered eating, from obesity to anorexia, and the promotion of positive body-esteem through education, outreach and action.

Eating Disorder Referral and Information Center (EDRIC) includes links to sites which provide additional information on eating disorders and related topics.

Eating Disorders Resource Center (EDRC) is a non-profit organization that links resources, information and support for eating disorders in Silicon Valley. The mission of EDRC is to increase awareness and understanding of eating disorders for the general public and health professionals; to promote early diagnosis, effective treatment, and recovery; and to advocate for mental health legislation and effective insurance coverage. EDRC offers a comprehensive, online resource directory.

F.E.A.S.T.  Families Empowered and Supporting Treatment of Eating Disorders is an international organization providing support to families and friends of those suffering from eating disorders. The site announces events and conferences, groups around the world, treatment providers, online caregivers and current news.

International Association of Eating Disorders Professionals (IAEDP) is well recognized for its excellence in providing education and training standards to an international multidisciplinary group of various healthcare treatment providers and helping professions, who treat the full spectrum of eating disorder problems.

Kristen Watt Foundation provides support for those suffering with eating disorders. The site has sections for parents, friends and coaches. They are dedicated to increasing awareness of eating disorders, education and treatment.

Multi-Service Eating Disorders Association (MEDA) is a nonprofit organization working to prevent and treat eating disorders. Their aim is to do this through early detection and increased public awareness. This site has events listed, resources and a place for individuals to join the organization.

National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders (ANAD) seeks to alleviate the problems of eating disorders by educating the public and healthcare professionals, encouraging research, and sharing resources on all aspects of these disorders. Their website includes information on finding support groups, referrals, treatment centers, advocacy and background on eating disorders.

National Association for Males with Eating Disorders, Inc. (N.A.M.E.D.) is dedicated to offering support to and public awareness about males with eating disorders.

National Institute of Mental Health: Eating Disorders provides information on anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, binge-eating disorder, the affect eating disorders can have on men, treatment options and helpful resources and links.

Perfect Illusions. Discover what an eating disorder is, find help and resources, and look into the lives of several individuals and their families who are struggling with the consequences of anorexia and bulimia.

The Renfrew Center. Residential treatment facility specializing in eating disorders (anorexia, bulimia and binge eating disorders) and related mental health issues. The Renfrew Center is a women's mental health center with locations in Philadelphia and Radnor, Pennsylvania; Coconut Creek, Florida; New York City; Old Greenwich, Connecticut; Ridgewood, New Jersey; Charlotte, North Carolina, Nashville, TN, Dallas, TX, and Bethesda, MD.

Womenshealth.gov The National Women's Health Information Center is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The site has information on body image, cosmetic surgery, eating disorders, and a list of links to various informational websites.







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