Wednesday, May 31, 2017

National Senior Health and Fitness Day - “With Movement... There's Improvement!”

Celebrate the 24th annual National Senior Health and Fitness Day. 100,000 older adults will participate in activities at more than 1,000 locations throughout the U.S. The goal is to help keep older Americans healthy and fit. National Senior Health and Fitness Day is the nation's largest annual health promotion event for older adults. 
The 2017 Theme, ““With Movement... There's Improvement!”

Benefits of Getting Older

Global Aging

Shopping and nutrition tips
for senior citizens

from Elisa Zeid, MS, RD

Resources and References

Tuesday, May 30, 2017

May, Global Employee Health and Fitness Month

Employees’ Health And Fitness Programs
Workplace Wellness Programs enhance the
overall health and productivity of your organization.

Benefits For Employers
Increase employee productivity
Improve health care costs
Less illness and injuries
Reduce employee absenteeism

Benefits For Employees
Less stress
Improve physical fitness
Better eating habits or weight control
Increase physical and mental health 

6 Steps to Creating a Wellness Program
Presentor: Mitzi Dulan, RD

Bob Harper from the "Biggest Loser" provides
tips on how to stay
healthy at work.

Global Employee Health and Fitness Month™ is Administered annually by the National Association for Health and Fitness. NEHF is a national health observance, created to promote the benefits of physical activity for individuals through their work site health promotion activities. Founded in 1989 National Employee Health and Fitness Month has enlisted tens of thousands of participants from employers around the world.

For More Information on how to Improve Employee Health and Fitness visit the following links:
Global Employee Health and Fitness Month

Monday, May 29, 2017

Memorial Day Traditions and Safety

Memorial Day Weekend Food Safety

Memorial Day, originally called Decoration Day, is a day of remembrance for those who have died in our nation's service.  Many Americans observe Memorial Day by visiting cemeteries and memorials of soldiers who lost their lives protecting our freedoms.  On Memorial Day the flag is raised briskly to the top of the staff and then solemnly lowered to the half-staff position, where it remains until noon. It is then raised to full-staff for the remainder of the day. At 3 p.m. local time, a national moment of remembrance takes place.

Memorial Day often marks the start of the summer vacation season. Families gather together for a long weekend marked by barbecuing, fireworks and trips to the beach. This is an important time to remember food safety practices.

Safe Summer Grilling Advice 
from the Department of Agriculture

Food Safety Advice for
Beach and Boat Outings

Sunday, May 28, 2017

May 28, National Hamburger Day
Fast Foods, Varieties, Recipes and Safety

The Burger has many variations. The article looks at the nutrition information
of Fast Food Burgers, varieties, recipes and food safety.

The Fast Food Burger
Burger Love Handles is a song written by Don MacLeod about his personal battle with being overweight. The song focuses on the fast food burger as one of his difficulties in losing weight.

Many fast food items are high in Fat, Cholesterol, Saturated Fat and Sodium and are Risk Factors associated with Heart Disease. However, the informed customer can make healthier choices at fast food restaurants. Below is the nutrition information of some Fast Food Hamburgers. Calories range from 140 for a White Castle Slyder to 1061 calories for a Burger King Cheeseburger, Double Whopper.

Burger Variations
The variations of burgers are constantly changing and expanding to meet our personal preferences, cultural differences and/or nutritional needs.

A burger is not just a ground beef patty served on a bun with the numerous extras, such as tomatoes, lettuce, pickles, onions, jalapeno, cheese, ketchup, mayo, mustard, relish - the list is endless. Today, you can prepare or order a burger made from just about any food you can ground up and serve on a bun.

Some of the ground beef alternatives include:

In addition, to the variations listed above, there are numerous variations based on the percent of fat in ground beef and ground poultry.

Recipes using Alternatives to Ground Beef
Click the recipe title to obtain a copy of the recipe.

Black Bean Burgers. courtesy Sandra Lee from Sandra's Money Saving Meals. This recipe is 302 Calories and 5 g Fat
Boca Burger, Meatless California Burger by Boca Burger.
Calories 230 and 6 grams Fat.

Stuffed Turkey Burgers, Ellie Krieger, Show: Food Network Specials Episode. Calories 286 and 10 grams Fat.

Food Safety
Memorial Day is quickly approaching and many Americans will be using the Barbecue to prepare there favorite Burgers. It is extremely important to practice good food safety techniques.

Safe Summer Grilling Advice from the Department of Agriculture
Food safety officials and partners have some tips for a successful barbecue season.

The USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline
can help answer your questions about the safe storage, handling
and preparation of meat, poultry, and egg products.

Saturday, May 27, 2017

National Asparagus Month - Selection, Preparation, Recipes

Asparagus is a perennial garden plant belonging to the Lily family. It is harvested in the spring when it is 6 to 8 inches tall. The most common variety of asparagus is green in color. There are two other edible varieties available. White asparagus is grown underground to inhibit its development of chlorophyll content, therefore creating its distinctive white coloring. It is generally found canned, although you may find it fresh in some select markets, and it is generally more expensive than the green variety since its production is more labor intensive. The other edible variety of asparagus is purple in color. It is smaller than the green or white variety (usually just 2 to 3 inches tall) and features a fruitier flavor. It also provides benefits from phytonutrients called anthocyanins that give it its purple color.

Nutrition Information
Low in calories, only 20 per 3.5 oz. serving
Contains no fat or cholesterol
Very low in sodium
A good source of potassium.(1)
A source of fiber (2 grams per 3.5 serving)
An excellent source of folic acid
A significant source of thiamin and vitamin B6

Asparagus stalks should be rounded, and neither fat nor twisted. Look for firm, thin stems with deep green or purplish closed tips. The cut ends should not be too woody, although a little woodiness at the base prevents the stalk from drying out. Once trimmed and cooked, asparagus loses about half its total weight. Use asparagus within a day or two after purchasing for best flavor and texture. Store in the refrigerator with the ends wrapped in a damp paper towel.

Preparation and Cooking
Thin asparagus does not require peeling. Asparagus with thick stems should be peeled because the stems are usually tough and stringy. Remove the tough outer skin of the bottom portion of the stem (not the tips) with a vegetable peeler. Wash asparagus under cold water to remove any sand or soil residues. It is best to cook asparagus whole. If you want to cut asparagus into small pieces, it is best to cut them after they are cooked. Asparagus can be served hot or cold.

Serving Ideas
•  Add cold asparagus to your favorite salad.
•  Toss cooked pasta with asparagus, olive oil and your favorite pasta spices. 
•  Chopped asparagus make a flavorful and colorful addition to omelets.
•  Sauté asparagus with garlic, mushrooms and tofu or chicken for a complete meal.

Asparagus Recipes & Tips from The Produce Lady

How To Make Perfectly Roasted Asparagus

EatingWell, Asparagus 

Food Network, Asparagus recipes

Friday, May 26, 2017

Heat Safety Awareness Day

Heat Safety Awareness Day
1. National Weather Service
2. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, Hydrate Right

Heat is one of the leading weather-related killers in the United States, resulting in hundreds of fatalities each year. Heat-related illnesses may occur when the body’s temperature rises too quickly to cool itself properly, or when too much fluid or salt is lost through dehydration, excessive urination or sweating.

Heat-related illnesses can range from cramps to heat exhaustion to heat stroke. Heat stroke can result in death and requires immediate medical attention.

At Risk

Factors or conditions making some individuals more susceptible to heat-related illnesses include older adults, young children, physically disabled, excessive body weight, fever, heart disease, mental illness, poor circulation, prescription medication, alcohol use, and sunburn.

Stay Hydrated

Drink plenty of water, non-alcoholic and decaffeinated fluids. Our body needs water to keep cool. Persons who are on fluid restrictive diets or have a problem with fluid retention should consult a physician before increasing their consumption of fluids. Limit caffeinated beverages and do not drink alcoholic beverages. 

Staying hydrated is important, especially when the temperature rises or during increased physical activity. Try these easy ways to increase your fluid intake:

1. Carry a reusable water bottle. Keep it full.
2. Add flavor to your water, such as slices of lemon, lime, cucumber or strawberries. Herbal ice teas can be a great way to increase fluids.
3. Eat fruit or popsicles. You can get fluids from the foods you eat. Watermelon and cantaloupe have high water content. A 100% fruit juice pop provides fluids and is refreshing on a hot day.
4. Plan ahead. If you are going to be outside at a picnic or ball game, make sure to pack plenty of fluids.

Never Leave Children, Disabled Individuals
or Pets in Parked Vehicles

Each year children and pets left in parked cars die from hyperthermia. Hyperthermia is an acute condition occurring when the body absorbs more heat than it can handle. Studies have shown temperatures inside a parked vehicle can rapidly rise to a dangerous level for children, pets and even adults. Leaving the windows slightly open does not significantly decrease the heating rate. The effects can be more severe on children because their bodies warm at a faster rate than adults.


PBSO demonstrates dangers of heat inside car

Wednesday, May 24, 2017

National Osteoporosis Awareness and Prevention Month

May is National Osteoporosis Awareness and Prevention Month. The National Osteoporosis Foundation (NOF) is the leading consumer and community-focused health organization dedicated to the prevention of osteoporosis and broken bones, the promotion of strong bones for life and the reduction of human suffering through programs of public and clinician awareness, education, advocacy and research.

The drastic consequence of osteoporosis is visible in the lives of the millions of sufferers worldwide. Researchers today know a lot about how you can protect your bones throughout your life. Getting enough calcium, vitamin D and regular exercise are important for your bones.

Feed Your Bones Today

Fact and Fiction about Osteoporosis

What You Need To Know About Milk

Nutrition and Health: Osteoporosis
by The Dairy and Nutrition Council of Indiana and Indiana Dairy Farmers

You’re never too young or too old to improve the health of your bones. Osteoporosis prevention should begin in childhood. But it shouldn’t stop there. Whatever your age, the habits you adopt now can affect your bone health for the rest of your life. Now is the time to take action.

Monday, May 22, 2017

May 22, International Day for Biological Diversity

The United Nations proclaimed May 22 The International Day for Biological Diversity (IDB).  

The theme has been chosen to coincide with the observance of 2017 as the International Year of Sustainable Tourism for Development as proclaimed by the United Nations General Assembly in its Resolution 70/193 and for which the United Nations World Tourism Organization is providing leadership.

Biodiversity, at the level of species and ecosystems, provides an important foundation for many aspects of tourism. Recognition of the great importance to tourism economies of attractive landscapes and a rich biodiversity underpins the political and economic case for biodiversity conservation. Many issues addressed under the Convention on Biological Diversity directly affect the tourism sector. A well-managed tourist sector can contribute significantly to reducing threats to, and maintain or increase, key wildlife populations and biodiversity values through tourism revenue.

For many coastal communities, the survival of marine and coastal ecosystems and biodiversity is essential to their nutritional, spiritual, societal and religious well-being. But even for the many millions of people who may not think that they have any strong reliance on the ocean, marine ecosystems and wildlife provide all kinds of benefits. Many coastal environments provide protection for those farther inland from the ravages of the sea. Coral reefs buffer land from waves and storms and prevent beach erosion. Dune systems on beaches stabilize shorelines from erosion and encroachment. Mangroves, mudflats and deltas trap sediment, preventing the land behind it from sliding ever-seaward.

The ocean world is in all our daily lives. For example, sponges from the Mediterranean have been used for painting, cooking, cleaning and even contraception for at least 5,000 years. Substances derived from seaweeds stabilize and thicken creams, sauces, and pastes, are mixed into paint and used to make paper and even in skin lotion and toothpaste.

Many marine plants and animals also contain a multitude of substances already being used, or identified as being of potential use, in medicines. Each of the 700 known species of cone snail produces a unique cocktail of 100 to 200 toxins, some of which have already been developed into pain killers: one, which has been on the market since 2004, is more than 100 times more powerful than morphine. A 2010 study predicted the existence of between 250,000 and close to 600,000 chemicals in the marine environment, approximately 92 percent of which remained undiscovered; those chemicals, the study’s authors estimated, might yield up to 214 new anti-cancer drugs, worth anywhere from US $563 billion to $5.69 trillion.

Most importantly of all, tiny marine plants called phytoplankton produce energy, like plants on land, through photosynthesis. As a result of that photosynthesis, they release oxygen. In fact, phytoplankton release half of all oxygen in the atmosphere.

Under the Sea

International Day for Biological Diversity 2017

Sunday, May 21, 2017

World Day for Cultural Diversity
Exploring Food Diversity

Today is a wonderful day to celebrate the many cultural foods that makeup the American Cuisine. The diversity can be seen as we travel across the country. There are regional differences and the influences of immigrants from all over the world.

New England is known for seafood, particularly lobster, and a creamy clam chowder. The Southern states are known for collard greens (leafy greens), chicken and dumplings, black eyed peas and cornbread. Grits is a popular breakfast dish in the South. The Midwest has traditionally been a beef and grain producing area so meats, potatoes and breads are foods found there. In the Pacific Northwest fresh salmon is a specialty and in the Southwest, the Mexican influence can be seen. California and Hawaii are both known for growing many different fruits, and Alaska is known for its fish and King Crab.

As a nation of immigrants, our foods have expanded to include worldwide cuisines, traditions, and religious influences. Many ethnic dishes are joining the American food culture and are seeing an incredible boost in familiarity, approval and consumption.

Foods from All Over the World

Healthy Choices
Table of Cuisines (from Menu Solutions)

Healthier Choices
Delicatessen Selections
Extra lean corned beef, pastrami, or roast beef, beef brisket, and turkey breast are best; whole wheat or multi-grain breads; chicken or tuna salad; chopped herring; chef salad; fresh fruit plate with cottage cheese; dry bagel; borscht or broth soup; tossed salad, sliced tomatoes, beet salad, or carrot raisin salad.
High-fat meats (regular corn beef, hot pastrami, beef bologna, hot dogs, knockwurst, liverwurst, and salami); potato salad; mayonnaise based salads; combo sandwiches (Reuben); smoked fish (lox); creamy coleslaw; chopped liver; excess cream cheese and cheese spreads; sauerkraut (high in sodium).
Pizza Parlor Selections
You cannot go wrong by ordering extra toppings such as onions, peppers, mushrooms, tomato slices, broccoli and spinach. Other possibilities include chicken, crab meat, or shrimp.  
Fat starts with the basic cheese, so avoid extra cheese and in particular mozzarella. Other culprits include bacon, meatballs, pepperoni, sausage, and prosciutto, as well as anchovies.
Sandwich Shop Selections
Both 100% whole wheat and pita bread are great choices. Good sandwich fillers are grilled chicken breast, ham, roast beef, and turkey breast. Instruct the server not to add butter, margarine, or mayonnaise to the bread and substitute with ketchup, mustard, or horseradish. Good salad choices include chef, garden, or Greek salads, but remember to ask for low-calorie dressings on the side and to omit egg or cheese. Broth-type soups are good, such as barley, beef, chicken, lentil, split pea, and vegetable noodle.
Avoid croissants, cheese, excess mayonnaise, egg, and creamy soups. Beware of "diet plates" with big burgers and scoops of cottage cheese, which have loads of saturated fat. Omit cheeseburgers, cheese sandwiches, or grilled cheese "melts" over chicken and seafood salads; and cold cuts. Combo sandwiches with meat and cheese and club sandwiches are best avoided due to the large portion size.Remember that salad combos such as tuna, chicken, and crab meat have lots of mayonnaise. Avoid creamy soups such as chowders or cream of "anything."
Submarine Shop Selections
Order the smaller size roll or pita bread. Turkey, smoked turkey, ham, and roast beef are acceptable. Ask the server to go light on the meats, omit the mayonnaise or oil, and generously load up on the shredded lettuce, onion, peppers, pickles, and sliced tomatoes. Choose salads as alternatives when available, such as chef or tossed salads with perhaps a scoop of tuna, chicken, or seafood served with Italian or pita bread. 
Omit meats such as bologna, Italian cold cuts, salami (hard or Genoa) and sausages. Stay away from cheeses and steak and cheese. Other items to omit include antipasto salads, fried eggplant, and chicken cutlets.
Chinese Selections
Order plain steamed rice; boiled, steamed, or stir-fried vegetables (ask for little oil to be used); moderate fish and shellfish; non-fried tofu; skinless poultry and egg roll (insides only).
Anything fried (rice or crispy noodles), or with sweet and sour sauce; egg dishes or soups; salty soups; avoid duck and limit beef, pork and picked foods; excess soy sauce; ask chef to leave out MSG and cut down the use of commonly used corn starch, sugar, and salt.
Indian Selections
Order chutney (except mango); curry sauce (yogurt based); fish (omit butter basting); yogurt with shredded vegetables; basmati rice. Biryani (vegetable dish); chapatti or papadum bread; tandoori chicken; lentil or mulligatawny soups
Creamy or high-salt soups; clarified butter (ghee); deep fried meats; poori or paratha bread; fried samosa or pakora; ask to prepare dishes without excess salt and to omit coconut milk, if possible; omit garnishes with nuts or dried fruit.
Italian Selections
Order antipasto (no oil or excess meats); crusty bread (no oil or butter); broiled or grilled fish, seafood, chicken, and meats; garlic; plain or vegetable pasta; fresh unsalted mozzarella cheese; steamed leafy vegetables (kale and broccoli); salads; fresh tomatoes; zucchini; ices.
Garlic bread; stuffed pastas (ravioli and lasagna); fried eggplant; meatballs or sausage; sauces with butter, cream, oil, and wine base; pesto sauce; cheese-filled or parmesan style dishes; spumoni or tortoni ice cream. Beware of risotto rice; polenta; and high-fat, high-sodium prosciutto ham and pancetta; veal cutlets and Caesar salads.
Japanese Selections
Order rice; steamed fish; sushi; sashimi; miso soup; raw vegetables; tofu; sukiyaki (stir-fried); yakimono (broiled fish).
Tempura and other deep-fried food; excess peanut and teriyaki sauce; pickled foods; excess salt and sugar in sauces; excess salt in soy marinades and sauces.
Mediterranean (Middle East) Selections
Order couscous, bulgar, and pita bread; legumes such as chickpeas, fava beans, and lentils; hummus; grape leaves; yogurt.
Phyllo dough dishes for sweet desserts such as baklava; feta and kasseri cheese; excess anchovies and olives; high sodium foods; feta, olives and sausage; appetizers in general, except salads; excess fat from butter, olive oil, omelet's and tahini.
Mexican Selections
Order soft-shell tacos; burritos; fajitas; salsa; chicken enchilada; black beans or Mexican rice; grilled fish or chicken; salads without chips or shells; moderate corn or flour tortilla, using minimal oil; cerviche (marinated fish); gazpacho; chile con carne soup, with no cheese. Acceptable items include shredded lettuce; spicy meats; diced tomatoes; salsa verde; picante or tomato sauce; use Mexican salads as appetizers, with salsa as the dressing.
Chips, nachos; super nachos; chili con queso; fried taco or tortilla shells; guacamole; sour cream; cheese; refried beans; beef and pork dishes; olives; items such as chilies rellenos, chimichangas, chorizo (sausage), and flautas.
Thai Selections
Order steamed rice; broth-based soups (tom yum koang and pok taek); non-fried proteins, such as chicken, seafood, and tofu; vegetables; satay or steamed mussels; salads with light dressings, made with Thai spices.
Excess sodium; soy sauce and sugar; MSG; coconut milk, coconut oil; cream dishes, high milk and sodium soups; many fried appetizers; curry or curry sauce; fried eggplant; cashew and peanut toppings.

1. United Nations. World Day for Cultural Diversity

Saturday, May 20, 2017

International Pickle Week - Nutrition and Pickling

                      Quick Pickles - Everyday Food with Sarah Carey



May is National High Blood Pressure
Education Month

The World Hypertension League (WHL) is a division of the International Society of Hypertension (ISH), and is in official relations with the World Health Organization (WHO).

World Hypertension Day was established to highlight preventable stroke, heart and kidney diseases caused by high blood pressure and to communicate to the public information on prevention, detection and treatment.

What is Blood Pressure?

Blood pressure is the force applied against the walls of the arteries as the heart pumps blood through the body.

Know Your Blood Pressure Number
The first number, systolic blood pressure measures the maximum pressure exerted as the heart contracts. A measurement over 90 and under 140 is generally considered normal for an adult.
The lower number indicates diastolic pressure is a measurement taken between beats, when the heart is at rest. A measurement over 60 and under 90 is generally considered normal for an adult.

High Blood Pressure is a Global Epidemic. Over 1.5 billion people world-wide suffer from high blood pressure (or hypertension).

Lower Your Sodium

Prevention and Control of High Blood Pressure
1. Maintain a Healthy Weight
2. Eat More Fresh Vegetables and Fruits
3. Cut Back on Salt Intake
4. Exercise
5. Check your Blood Pressure Regularly
6. If you are on medication, take the medication as prescribed.

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI). National High Blood Pressure Education Program

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). High Blood Pressure Education Month

The International Society of Hypertension (ISH).
ISH's main objectives are to promote and encourage the advancement of scientific knowledge in all aspects of research and its application to prevention and management of heart disease and stroke in hypertension and related cardiovascular diseases around the world.

The World Hypertension League (WHL).  The objectives of the World Hypertension League (WHL) are to promote the detection, control and prevention of arterial hypertension in populations. News

Dietitian Blog List