Wednesday, August 31, 2016

September Food, Nutrition, and Health Events


Current News, Resources and Events in Nutrition, Food, Health, Environment, Safety and Disability Rights. Encourages awareness and inspires ideas for Journalists, Educators, Consumers and Health Professionals. Wellness News is up-dated daily and includes weekly and daily events. To view the entire Newsletter online click here.


September Health, Nutrition, and Food Events
 



September
Events, Celebrations and Resources
Weekly and Daily Events can be found in
the Wellness Newsletter.


 Hunger Action Month


National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month
September Food Events and Celebrations

     
Better Breakfast Month 

America on the Move
Go Wild during California Wild Rice Month
Great American Low-Cholesterol,
Low-Fat Pizza Bake Month
National Biscuit Month
National Chicken Month


National Cholesterol Education Month
National Coupon Month
National Ethnic Foods Month
National Honey Month
National Mushroom Month
National Organic Harvest Month
National Papaya Month
National Potato Month
National Prime Beef Month
National Rice Month
Whole Grains Month
National Yoga Month
Healthy Aging Month
Mold Awareness Month
Sports and Home Eye Health & Safety Month
Backpack Safety America Month
Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Month
Baby Safety Month
Childhood Cancer Awareness Month
Gynecology Cancer Awareness Month
National Recovery Month
National Atrial Fibrillation Awareness Month
National DNA, Genomics, & Stem Cell Education Month
National Menopause Awareness Month
National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month
National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month
National Sickle Cell Awareness Month
National Skin Care Awareness Month
Newborn Screening Awareness Month
Leukemia and Lymphoma Awareness Month
National Preparedness Month
Be Kind to Editors and Writers Month
International Update Your Resume Month
Responsible Dog Ownership Month




August 31, National Trail Mix Day
The Food Label Detective:
Emerald Trail Mix


*FDA 21 CFR 101.9 Nutrition labeling of food. FDA regulation allows manufacturers to round number of servings to the nearest 0.5 serving, as long as they use the term “about”. Serving size is based on RACC = Reference Amount Customarily Consumed per Eating Occasion.


One Serving Size: 1oz (28g)
130 calories per Servings
Package Size: Net Wt. 2.25 oz (63.8g)
About 2 Servings per package

Findings
Actual Serving per Package = 2.3
299 Calories per Package

Read the Label; an Educated Consumer has the knowledge
to make the Best Choices.

Tuesday, August 30, 2016

Kids Eat Right Month - The Kid Friendly Kitchen


Help your kids start young and master simple cooking tasks before moving on to more complex skills. Use these age-appropriate ideas to keep your kids excited, safe and well-educated in the kitchen! To learn more, visit Kids Eat Right at Kid-Friendly Kitchen Tasks Infographic





Monday, August 29, 2016

August 29, More Herbs, Less Salt Day and
National Lemon Juice Day

Instead of salt, use spices, herbs, lemon juice, and/or vinegar to
enhance the taste of your food. The health benefits are life-long.


Wikipedia has provided an extensive list of culinary herbs and spices. The list does not contain salt (which is a mineral) or plants used primarily as herbal teas or medicinal herbs. Explore the different flavors and cultures.

Tips for Selecting and Storing
Herbs and Spices


Spice it Up with
Susan Bowerman, MS, RD, CSSD


Cutting Back on Salt in Your Diet
from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics


Where does sodium come from?
Sodium comes from natural sources or are added to foods. Most foods in their natural state contain some sodium. However, the majority of sodium Americans consume comes from sodium added to processed foods by manufacturers. While some of this sodium is added to foods for safety reasons, the amount of salt added to processed foods is above what is required for safety and function of the food supply.

Reading Labels
When you buy prepared and packaged foods, read the labels. You can tell the sodium content by looking at the Nutrition Facts panel of a food. Listed are the amount for sodium, in milligrams (mg), and the “% Daily Value.” Also read the ingredient list to watch for the words "soda" (referring to sodium bicarbonate, or baking soda), "sodium" and the symbol "Na" to see if the product contains sodium.

Salt and/or Sodium Descriptors

Salt Free:  Meets requirements for "sodium free."
Sodium Free: Fewer than 5 milligrams sodium per serving.
Very Low Sodium:  35 milligrams or less sodium per serving.
Low Sodium: 140 milligrams or less per serving 
Reduced Sodium:  At least 25 percent less sodium per serving.
Unsalted:  Has no salt added during processing. To use this term, the product it resembles must normally be processed with salt and the label must note that the food is not a sodium-free food if it does not meet the requirements for "sodium free".

The FDA and USDA state an individual food that has the claim "healthy" must not exceed 480 mg sodium per reference amount. "Meal type" products must not exceed 600 mg sodium per labeled serving size.

Sodium and Hypertension.
In order for a food to make an Allowable Health Claim it must contain a defined amount of nutrients. In relationship to sodium and Hypertension the amount is 140 milligrams or less sodium per serving.

American Heart Association (AHA)
The American Heart Association recommends you choose and prepare foods with little or no salt to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. Aim to eat less than 1,500 mg of sodium per day (less that 3/4 teaspoon of salt).
The AHA is working with federal agencies to identify ways to reduce the amount of sodium in the food supply. The association is encouraging food manufacturers and restaurants to reduce the amount of sodium in foods by 50 percent over a 10-year period. AHA will help Americans lower the amount of sodium they consume by the following strategies:
 1. Reduce the amount of sodium in the food supply,
 2. Make more healthy foods available (e.g., more fruits and vegetables); and
 3. Provide consumers with education and decision-making tools to make better choices.

 
Tips for reducing sodium in the diet
 1.  Choose fresh, frozen or canned food items without added salts.
 2.  Select unsalted nuts or seeds, dried beans, peas and lentils.
 3.  Limit salty snacks like chips and pretzels.
 4.  Avoid adding salt and canned vegetables to homemade dishes.
 5.  Select unsalted, lower sodium, fat-free broths, bouillons or soups.
 6.  Select fat-free or low-fat milk, low-sodium, low-fat cheeses and low-fat yogurt.
 7.  Use spices and herbs to enhance the taste of your food. 
 8.  Add fresh lemon juice instead of salt to fish and vegetables.
 9.  When dining out, ask for your dish to be prepared without salt.
10. Don’t use the salt shaker.





Sunday, August 28, 2016

National Water Quality Month - Is Your Water Safe?

When the water in our rivers, lakes, and oceans becomes polluted, the effects can be far reaching. It can endanger wildlife, make our drinking water unsafe and threaten the waters where we swim and fish.


The Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) is the federal law that protects public drinking water supplies throughout the nation. Under the SDWA, the 
US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) sets standards for drinking water quality and with its partners implements various technical and financial programs to ensure drinking water safety.




The mission of EPA is to protect human health and the environment. EPA's purpose is to ensure that: all Americans are protected from significant risks to human health and the environment where they live, learn and work; national efforts to reduce environmental risk are based on the best available scientific information; federal laws protecting human health and the environment are enforced fairly and effectively; environmental protection is an integral consideration in U.S. policies concerning natural resources, human health, economic growth, energy, transportation, agriculture, industry, and international trade, and these factors are similarly considered in establishing environmental policy; all parts of society - communities, individuals, businesses, and state, local and tribal governments - have access to accurate information sufficient to effectively participate in managing human health and environmental risks; environmental protection contributes to making our communities and ecosystems diverse, sustainable and economically productive; and the United States plays a leadership role in working with other nations to protect the global environment. So what happened in Flint, Michigan and are other communities are at risk?



Drinking Water in your Home
Many people choose to filter or test the drinking water that comes out of their tap or from their private well for a variety of reasons. And whether at home, at work or while traveling, many Americans drink bottled water.





Saturday, August 27, 2016

August 27, Banana Lovers Day: Nutrition, Selection, Storage, and Recipes



Selection
Choose bananas that are firm and free of bruises. Bananas are best to eat when the skin color is solid yellow and speckled with brown. Bananas with green tips or with practically no yellow color have not developed their full flavor. Bananas are overripe when they have a strong odor.

Storage
To ripen bananas leave at room temperature for a couple of days. Once ripe store in the refrigerator for 3 to 5 days. The peel may turn brown in the refrigerator, but the fruit will not change.

Recipes
If you love bananas, Eating Well has a collection of Banana Recipes you are sure to enjoy.


Chiquita Banana The Original Commercial 
Produced by Disney Studios in the 40's, this commercial appeared only in movie theaters, and for over 50 years kept us humming its catchy tune.


DOLE Banana Growing and Planting
Dole explains the growing and planting of bananas.


Banana Farm
The banana farm at EARTH University uses socially and environmentally responsible practices at every stage of the process. The farm plants trees along river banks to promote biodiversity and reduce harmful erosion. In addition, they do not use herbicides. The farm's eco-friendly practices produce some of the most flavorful bananas in the world.

Thursday, August 25, 2016

August 25, National Banana Split Day - Fruit Festival




Ingredients
1 Banana, split in half
1 Kiwifruit, peeled and sliced
4 Strawberries, sliced
1/4 cup Cherries, sliced
1/2 cup Orange Segments
1/2 cup Low Fat Ice Cream, optional








Wednesday, August 24, 2016

Home Food Safety
When the Power Goes Out



Be Prepared

Stock up on non-perishable foods that don't require refrigeration, and choose single-serve sizes if available to avoid the need for refrigeration of unused portions. Consider these easy, healthy, shelf-stable foods: 






Summary

 More information can be found at Home Food Safety

August 24, National Waffle Day: Portion Control and Variety


Nutrition Information



Monday, August 22, 2016

August 22, Eat a Peach Day - Nutrition, Safety and Presentation

Presentation. Transform a peach into an eloquent dessert. Cut the peach into slices or cubes and serve in a dessert glass. Somehow the presentation makes the peach taste sweeter and the experience filling.

Peach Nutrition
Low fat; saturated fat free; sodium free; cholesterol free; 
good source of vitamin C.

From Fruits and Veggies, More Matters:
Peaches
How to Select
Choose peaches with firm, fuzzy skins that yield to gentle pressure when ripe. Avoid blemishes.

How to Store Peaches and Nectarines, Kids Eat Right
Store unripe peaches in paper bag. When ripe, store at room temperature for use within 1-2 days.


Resources.
Georgia Peach Council
Fruits and Veggies, More Matters. Peaches
Top 10 Ways to Enjoy Peaches 





Sunday, August 21, 2016

August 21, National Senior Citizen Day - Keep Older Americans Healthy and Fit

National Senior Citizens Day 

On August 19, 1988, President Ronald Reagan issued Proclamation 5847 creating National Senior Citizens Day to be August 21.

On this day, we are encouraged to recognize and show appreciation for the value and contribution of older people to home, family and society. It is an opportunity for us to show our gratitude for what seniors have achieved in their lives and their contributions to our communities.

Things to do with Older Adults
- Spend time together.
- Show our appreciation.
- Volunteer to help.
- Enjoy a walk together.
- Go out for dinner.

If you are a senior citizen, enjoy your day. Make sure to take advantage of senior citizen discounts and specials.


The goal is to help keep older Americans healthy and fit. 


Benefits of Getting Older

Global Aging


Shopping and nutrition tips
for senior citizens

from Elisa Zeid, MS, RD

Resources and References
to Help Eating Well as We Age

Saturday, August 20, 2016

Do You Know What's On Your Kitchen Sponge?


One of the most dangerous sources of virulent bacteria, including E. coli, Salmonella, Staphylococcus and others, is the kitchen sponge and 'dish cloths' in American homes.

Ways To Clean Your Kitchen Sponge or Dish Cloth

1. Wet the sponge well and microwave it on high for about 2 minutes. Be careful a dry sponge can catch on fire.

2. Wash it in the hot cycle of your washing machine and leave them there through a drying cycle.

3. Clean the sponge and sanitize it in a diluted bleach solution (1 tablespoon of bleach added to 1 gallon of water) before using a second time.

4. Replace worn sponges rather than reusing.

5. Avoid using your kitchen sponge to wipe up raw eggs, meat juice and other food items typically high in harmful bacteria. If you do use your sponge for such purposes, wash and disinfect it immediately afterward.

6. Clean your sponge after each use.


Resources.

Eat Right. Dos and Don'ts of Kitchen Sponge SafetyHome Food Safety. How Safe is Your Kitchen?

Friday, August 19, 2016

August 19 - World Humanitarian Day - Inspire Humanitarian Work Around the World


This year we are shining the spotlight on humanitarians around the world and profiling Humanitarian Heroes – people from all walks of life, who are committed to making a difference. World Humanitarian Day is an opportunity to celebrate the spirit that inspires humanitarian work around the world. Thousands of people across the globe are doing incredible work every day. But unfortunately some of them pay the ultimate price. This World Humanitarian Day, we honour those humanitarians who face danger to help people in need. We remember their sacrifice. Stand in support for those who risk their lives every day. 





World Humanitarian Day is a time to recognize those who face danger and adversity in order to help others. The day was designated by the General Assembly to coincide with the anniversary of the 2003 bombing of the United Nations headquarters in Baghdad, Iraq, which killed 22 UN staff. 

Natural disasters, conflicts and other emergencies threaten the lives and health of millions of people every year. In the middle of such crises, thousands of dedicated humanitarian workers strive to care for those who have been affected and support local authorities to deliver assistance. On World Humanitarian Day, WHO and other international bodies are highlighting the roles performed by humanitarian workers, and remembering aid workers who have been killed or injured while performing their vital roles. 


World Humanitarian Day offers the chance:

· for the public to learn more about the humanitarian community, what aid workers do and the challenges they face;

· for nongovernmental and international bodies and UN agencies, to demonstrate their humanitarian activities;

· to pay respect to those who have died or been injured in the course of their humanitarian work.

To show your support for World Humanitarian Day visit  
http://worldhumanitarianday.org/

Thursday, August 18, 2016

Get Acquainted with Kiwifruit Month

sponsored by the California Kiwifruit Commission.

The Kiwifruit


History of the Kiwifruit.
Originally discovered in the Chang Kiang Valley of China, kiwifruit was considered a delicacy by the great Khans who enjoyed the emerald green color and wonderful flavor. By the mid 1800s, the fruit had found its way into other countries and was nicknamed the Chinese gooseberry. New Zealand growers started to export this exotic fruit to specialized markets around the world.

Then in 1962, a California produce dealer began importing New Zealand gooseberries. The dealer renamed the product "kiwifruit" because of its resemblance to the fuzzy brown kiwi — New Zealand's funny-looking national bird. By the late 1960s, California began producing its own kiwifruit in the Delano and Gridley areas.

How to Eat A Kiwi

There's no "right" or "wrong" way to eat California Kiwifruit. But since most people find that slicing and scooping is a good way to get the most from their kiwifruit, we coined the word "slooping" to describe it! Here's how to sloop your kiwi:

Using a sharp knife, slice the kiwifruit lengthwise to create two identical halves. Then use a spoon to scoop the sweet, delicious meat of the kiwifruit from each half. Looking for maximum fiber and nutrition? Don't throw that skin away! It's loaded with nutrients and fiber, so rinse it off and bite right in! 



The kiwifruit is a rich source of Vitamin C, Vitamin B6, Vitamin K and Fiber. It is low in calories, low in sodium, has no cholesterol and only a small amount of fat. 


One Large Kiwifruit, weighs about 3.5 ounces (100 grams) and provides the following nutrition.


Recipe from California Kiwifruit Commission.

Kiwi Mint Lemonade
Makes 4 servings 



If you don't have mint, try fresh lemon balm. The lemonade is also delicious without the herbs. 

Ingredients
1 cup (250 mL) water
 ½ (125 mL) cup granulated sugar
 ½ (125 mL) cup packed fresh mint leaves
 3 California kiwifruit
 3 lemons
 Sparkling water

Directions
1. In a medium saucepan, heat water with sugar over medium-high heat, stirring occasionally until sugar is dissolved. Simmer, uncovered, 5 minutes. Remove from heat and stir in mint leaves. Let stand 20 minutes.

2. Meanwhile, peel kiwifruit and cut into chunks. Puree in a food processor. Place puree in a pitcher. Strain cooled syrup into pitcher, pressing on mint, then discard leaves. Refrigerate until cold. Squeeze juice from 2 lemons. Stir into kiwifruit mixture. Taste, squeeze in juice from remaining lemon for a tarter lemonade.


3. Pour into glasses. Top with sparkling water. Serve garnished with a slice of kiwifruit. Makes about 2¼ cups (550 mL) without sparkling water, enough for 4 drinks.


For more recipes, visit the California Kiwi Commission.

Wednesday, August 17, 2016

August is Family Meal Month
The Rewards are Amazing
Make the Time


Family meal time is an ageless tradition shared by people all around the world. Eating dinner together keeps the doors of communication open. It's a perfect time to show your children they are your priority. Studies have shown children who eat dinner with their families are less likely to use alcohol, tobacco and illegal drugs and more likely to develop good eating habits.
 


Family Dinner
Segment from World Report, April 2009
A recent family study conducted by Brigham Young University, quizzed more than 1500 IBM employees. The results show that families who spend time eating dinner together will encounter less conflict between family and work.

The BYU study appeared in issues of Family and Consumer Sciences Research Journal, The Wall Street Journal, U.S. News and World Report and Slate magazine. Dr. Jacob expressed the hope for society to value dinner time, and not allow things to interrupt it.

In fact, a multi-national study cited by the marriage and family therapy program at the University of Minnesota and its director, reports family meal time has a more positive influence on emotional and intellectual development in children and teens than sports or additional time in school.

Nutritious Meals for Families on a Budget



Nutrition.gov News

Dietitian Blog List