Thursday, May 28, 2015

From “As Purchased” to “Edible Portion”
How to Analyze a Recipe using a Nutrient Database



Dr. Frank has over 25 years’ experience as a Nutrient Analysis Expert. She has worked with the media, cookbook publishers, recipe bloggers & websites. Dr. Frank wrote “From As Purchased to Edible Portion,” as an essential tool for anyone providing nutrient analysis.


Purchasing nutrient analysis software and learning how to use the program is only useful if you have the knowledge to convert “as purchased” ingredients to the “edible portion.” This book describes how to read a recipe and enter the correct ingredients and amounts, in order to provide an accurate nutrient analysis.



Do you have the knowledge and skills necessary to analyze a recipe? Take the quiz at the bottom of the page.




Nutrition Analysis is part of our everyday life. We have grown accustomed to nutrition information being readily available. But what if a recipe has no nutrition information or even worse the information is wrong?


People with medical conditions might not try the recipe. There are millions of people who have special dietary needs, such as low calorie, carbohydrate controlled, high protein, low protein, low carbohydrate, low fat, low cholesterol, low sodium, high fiber, gluten free, lactose free, peanut allergies, and these are just a few of the diets available.


Many people believe if they just buy a nutrient analysis program, they can provide an accurate nutrition analysis for a recipe. This is far from the truth.

Recipes are usually written based on what the consumer needs to purchase. The individual analyzing the recipe must evaluate the recipe based on the actual food ready to eat (unless the food is meant to be eaten whole.)

A nutrient analysis program cannot cook or prepare meals. A person must have skills in Food Science, Culinary Nutrition, Cooking and Preparation Techniques, Purchasing Guides, Yield Factors, and Nutrient Analysis Software.

An essential tool for analysis is the food conversion and equivalent tables. These databases provide information on AP (as purchased), EP (edible portion), waste, marinating, straining, percentage of bones; difference between a raw or cooked weight; comparison of weight versus volume measures. Many nutrient analysis software programs do not provide this information for all items; therefore it must be calculated manually or estimated.

Most Americans believe one cup is equal to eight ounces; and they would be right if we were referring to a liquid. In selecting the correct measure of a food, it is critical to know whether the food is measured by weight or by volume. Weight measures include grams, ounces, and pounds. Volume measures are listed as teaspoons, tablespoons, fluid ounces, cups, pints, quarts, and gallons.


Quiz: 
Do you have the knowledge and skills necessary to analyze a recipe? 

Below are a series of questions to determine your knowledge of foods and recipes in order to perform a nutrient analysis. The answers can be found at the following link. Answers to Quiz


1. How much does one cup of cheerios weigh in ounces and grams?

2. How many apples should you purchase to yield 2.75 cups, peeled, cored, and chopped?

3. The recipe states to purchase one pound potatoes. Directions: Bake potatoes and peel. How many ounces will be left?

4. How much lobster would you analyze, if provided with a 1.5 pound lobster in a shell? The answer should be in ounces.

5. Recipe states to purchase one pound chicken breast with bone and skin. Directions: Broil, remove skin. How many of ounces of cooked chicken will you analyze?

6. How many cups of cooked kidney beans would one pound dried kidney beans yield?

7. How many cups of all-purpose flour would a two pound bag of flour yield?

8. Recipe states to purchase one pound lean ground beef and broil. Drain fat. How many ounces of cooked ground beef would you analyze?

9. Recipe states to marinade chicken in refrigerator overnight. Prior to cooking, the marinade is drained and discarded. What percentage of the marinade should be included in the analysis?

10. You are preparing the analysis of a chicken broth. The directions state to strain and reserve the chicken and vegetables for another time. How would you analyze the recipe?


Consider adding nutrition information for your online recipes and menus.


An invaluable service for the Media, Publishers, Writers, Chefs, Recipe Websites and Blogs. Your readers will benefit from the Nutrition information. 






Thursday, May 7, 2015

May 4 - May 10, 2015 Screen-Free Week


Screen-Free Week (formerly TV-Turnoff, founded 1994) is an annual event in which parents, children, teachers and others across the country turn off screen media (TV, video games, computers, cell phones, etc.) and celebrate the magic of being unplugged. Screen-Free Week is a program of the Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood.

Screen-Free Week

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends no screen time for children under 2 and less than 2 hours per day for older children. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that parents create an electronic-media-free environment in children’s bedrooms.
 
The Benefits of Reduced Screen Time

• Reducing screen time can help prevent childhood obesity.

• Children who spend less time watching television in early years tend to do better in
school, have a healthier diet, and are more physically active.

Hazards of Too Much Screen Time

•Adolescents with a television in their bedroom spend more time watching TV and report less
physical activity, less healthy dietary habits, worse school performance, and fewer family
meals.

• Children with a television in their bedroom are more likely to be overweight.

Alternative Activities During Screen-Free Week
  • Prepare a family meal together.
  • Take a walk in the park.
  • Join a family fitness group.
  • Plant a vegetable garden or grow a fruit tree. 
  • Visit the zoo.
  • Plan a picnic or barbecue.
  • Go to a museum.
  • Take a nature hike.
  • Organize a scavenger hunt.
  • Learn yoga.
  • Go dancing.
  • Volunteer for a community or charitable organization
Resources
*American Heart Association, Limit Tube Time and Get Your Kids Moving
*Family-Friendly Things to Do During Screen-Free Week

*20 Alternatives to Television

Nutrition.gov News

Dietitian Blog List