Sunday, April 30, 2017

April 30, National Raisin Day


Raisins are dried grapes. They are fat and cholesterol free; gluten free; naturally low in sodium; a good source of dietary fiber, potassium, and antioxidants.

Raisins contain the phytochemicals, resveratrol and anthocyanin. Studies suggest resveratrol may provide protection against certain cancers, coronary heart disease, and infections. Anthocyanins may reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke; reverse the short-term memory loss associated with aging; reduce the risk of several types of cancer; help control high blood pressure; and help boost the immune system.

Serving Ideas
Eat them plain as a snack or add raisins to
·   Breakfast cereal
·   Yogurt or Ice Cream
·   Baked goods
·   Stuffing, Rice, Pasta
·   Salads
·   Trail Mix

Raisins and Sulfites
Commercially grown dried raisins are often treated with sulfur dioxide during processing in order to extend their shelf life. The sulfites used may cause adverse reactions in people who suffer from asthma.

Federal regulations prohibit the use of sulfites in foods classified as "organic."

Warning.
Raisins can cause renal failure in dogs. The cause is unknown.




1986 - The California Raisins



Growing and Harvesting Raisins

Resources
Fruits and Veggies More Matters: Raisins



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