Monday, December 30, 2013

2013 Eat Right Art Favorites


2013 Favorites from the Eat Right Art Collection


All photographs are available for purchase. Visit the Eat Right Art Collection or contact Sandra Frank, Ed.D, RDN, LN for custom designs.
The money we raise goes to employ adults with "Special Needs" (Cerebral Palsy, Autism, Down Syndrome, Muscular Dystrophy). Please make a donation or purchase a design.



Prepared by 
Sandra Frank, Ed.D, RD, LDN
Jake Frank
Michelle Canazaro
John Gargiullo

Tuesday, December 24, 2013

The Edible Christmas Tree

A fun and healthy project for the family to enjoy.

Supplies
Styrofoam Cones, assorted sizes (Can purchase at a craft shop
Toothpicks (Young children should be assisted by an adult)
Assortment of Fruits and Vegetables, such as Cantaloupe, Honeydew, Grapes, Watermelon, Mushroom, Arugula, Broccoli, Kiwi, Mango, Carrots, Tomatoes, Figs, Blueberries, Strawberries, Peppers, Squash, Carambola, Pomegranate Seeds, Cheddar Cheese, and Goat Cheese

1. Wash your hands.
2. Wash the fresh fruits and vegetables.
3. Wash your hands again.
4. Cut fruits and vegetables into a variety of shapes. Make sure the pieces are large enough to fit onto a toothpick.


5. Start at the bottom and work your way up. Use the largest fruits and vegetables first.
6. Be creative


7. Top your Christmas tree with Carambola (Starfruit).
8. Sprinkle Goat Cheese over the tree.
9. Serve with a low fat vanilla yogurt.



Friday, December 20, 2013

A Social Media Happy Holiday
Dietitians, Food and Nutrition Community

Warmest Wishes for a Wonderful Holiday 
and a Healthy and Happy New Year

To view a comprehensive list of dietitians and
nutrition resources online, visit: Dietitians-OnlineTwitter List



The Twitter List of Dietetic, Nutrition, Food and Health Experts is a resource for consumers, health care professionals, journalists and educators. The list continues to grow and includes dietitians throughout the world, dietetic associations and practice groups, government agencies and government funded programs, health and medical associations, CEU providers, nutrition education resources, dietetic internships and student dietetic associations, consumer advocacy groups, trade associations, and food corporations. 

The links do not constitute an endorsement. Some are intended to increase awareness of the food industry, government regulations, and current research in health care.

From all of Us, We wish you and your loved ones 
a very Happy Holiday 
and The Frank Family   



Electronic eCards Made from Edible Art







Thursday, December 19, 2013

Book Review: "Younger Next Week" by Elisa Zied, MS, RD, CDN

Elisa Zied, MS, RD, CDN is a remarkable person who motivates people to reach their goals though her books and media presence. Her new book, "Younger Next Week" captures the attention of the 40+ generation. Zied shares her secrets to turning back the clock by emphasizing, "vitality" in the foods we choose, lifestyle behaviors, and fitness.

In “Younger Next Week”, Zied offers surgery-free solutions that defy aging and promote healthy weight loss and emotional well-being with an easy to follow 7-Day Vitality Plan. The book features a Vitality Blueprint consisting of Zied’s signature “Stressipes” for optimal sleep and relation. The blueprint can be easily personalized for nutritional needs, interests, and schedule. 

“Younger Next Week is an empowering anti-aging, food based, vitality promoting book that shows women how to jump-start a lifetime of healthy habits.

Younger Next Week Free Giveaway (ends December 31)


To follow and learn more about Elisa Zied, MS, RD, CDN visit her at 
Website: Elisa Zied




Monday, December 16, 2013

Happy Kwanzaa

"Kwanzaa was created to introduce and reinforce seven basic values of African culture which contribute to building and reinforcing family, community and culture among African American people as well as Africans throughout the world African community. These values are called the Nguzo Saba which in Swahili means the Seven Principles. The Nguzo Saba stand at the heart of the origin and meaning of Kwanzaa, for it is these values which are not only the building blocks for community but also serve to reinforce and enhance them."   - Dr. Maulana Karenga (Founder and Creator)

Kwanzaa is a week-long celebration observed from December 26 to January 1 each year.
 

Edible Art: Seven Basic Principles of Kwanzaa.
The colors of the Kwanzaa flag are black, red and green; black for the people, red for their struggle, and green for the future and hope that comes from their struggle. It is based on the colors given by the Hon. Marcus Garvey as national colors for African people throughout the world.
 

The Kwanzaa art includes the following foods: apples, raspberries, strawberries, black beans, prunes, black berries, black rice, green bell peppers, broccoli, spinach, grapes, and string  beans.

             
Kwanzaa has seven basic symbols. Each represents values and concepts reflective of African culture and contributive to community building and reinforcement. The following are the basic symbols:

Mazao (The Crops) These are symbolic of African harvest celebrations and of the rewards of productive and collective labor. 

Mkeka (The Mat) This is symbolic of our tradition and history and therefore, the foundation on which we build. 

Kinara (The Candle Holder) This is symbolic of our roots, our parent people -- continental Africans.

Muhindi (The Corn) This is symbolic of our children and our future which they embody.

Mishumaa Saba (The Seven Candles) These are symbolic of the Nguzo Saba, the Seven Principles, the matrix and minimum set of values which African people are urged to live by in order to rescue and reconstruct their lives in their own image and according to their own needs.

Kikombe cha Umoja (The Unity Cup) This is symbolic of the foundational principle and practice of unity which makes all else possible.

Zawadi (The Gifts) These are symbolic of the labor and love of parents and the commitments made and kept by the children. 


The following videos share the history and traditions of Kwanzaa. The first video was created by Sesame Street and the story of Kwanzaa is told through a young  boy; the second video is a Happy Kwanzaa song by Teddy Pendergrass; and the third video is a trailer from "The Black Candle", narrated by Maya Angelou.

Sesame Street: Kwanzaa
 

Happy Kwanzaa 
Teddy Pendergrass


Kwanzaa, a Celebration.
"The Black Candle" trailer, 
narrated by Maya Angelou.


Wishing the lights of Kwanzaa
brings happiness, warmth and prosperity.


Resources
The Official Kwanzaa Web Site
The Official Kwanzaa Web Site, to make a donation  

 Wikipedia: Kwanzaa 


When you learn something from people, or from a culture,
you accept it as a gift, and it is your lifelong commitment
to preserve it and build on it. 
- Yo-Yo Ma


2014 Food, Nutrition, and Wellness Events Ebook
An Indispensable Tool for the Food and Health Writer



The “2014 Food, Nutrition, and Wellness Events” ebook is an indispensable tool for the food and/or health writer, blogger, dietitian, and editor. Each month highlights food, nutrition, and wellness events for the month, week, and day. Food photographs or graphic designs are provided to illustrate special events. In December, books by dietitians are featured.

The holidays and events listed come from numerous resources, such as: United States Department of Agriculture, Food and Drug Administration, Presidential Declaration, Federal, State or City Governments, Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, Food Associations, American Medical Association, Medical Affiliations, Private Organizations and Companies, Retail Promotions. The events have been verified. However, you should confirm the dates before making plans. Some events may vary from one state to another.

The “Wellness News” calendar employs adults with "Special Needs" (Cerebral Palsy, Autism, Down Syndrome, and Muscular Dystrophy). Part of the monies raised go to employ special need adults.



2014 Food, Nutrition and Wellness Events

Sandra Frank, Ed.D, RDN
Digital Downloads

The Edible Alphabet

Sandra Frank, Ed.D, RDN
Digital Download

$4.99


Eat Right Art &
Photographs at Etsy
Sandra Frank, Ed.D, RDN
Digital Downloads

History of the Wellness Calendar

The wellness calendar has a history spanning over 20 years. When my son Jake was about two years old (back in 1990), he discovered the joys of celebrations and holidays. As most children, he associated these events with family, food, fun, music and gifts.

We had just recently learned Jake has cerebral palsy. Much of his young life had numerous challenges; it was a delight to see him so excited about these events.

Every day he would ask me, “What are we celebrating today?” Initially, I would make up events, such as a new tooth, the sun is out, etc... Eventually I would research reference books and later the Internet to see if there were special functions occurring on a specific day.

To my surprise, I found numerous events each day of the year, but there were too many and it was a bit overwhelming. I started to note those days that dealt only with Health, Nutrition, Food, Safety, Disability Rights and Environmental Issues.

I realized many of these events went unnoticed or unreported by Journalists, Educators and Health Professionals. In 2002, I started to send out about 50 calendars to local and national media representatives in the hope the topics would encourage awareness and inspire ideas for stories and/or projects. Each year the number of calendars we sent out would increase, as did the thank you notes from local, national and worldwide correspondents.

Then in 2006, Jake and his friends graduated high school. They were unable to find employment due to their disabilities. I asked them if they would be interested in working with me on the Wellness Calendar. They said, “Yes”.

The project became a wonderful way to raise money to help them with their ADL, self-esteem, independence.

The calendar was created to make sure every Journalist and Educator knew when certain events occurred, such as National Nutrition Month, World Diabetes Day, Earth Day, RD Day and many others. The goal was to provide a useful tool to impress their editors with some interesting time-sensitive stories.

Later on, the calendar served to provide employment to individuals who were unable to find jobs due to their special abilities.

Remember to Make Every Day Special, Make Every Day Count.

with warm regards,
Dr. Sandra Frank and Jake Frank

Sunday, December 15, 2013

Celebrating Twenty-five Years Providing Nutritional Analysis for the Media
Why use a dietitian for nutritional analysis?

This December marks 25 years working in the area of nutrition analysis for the media, cookbook publishers, recipe bloggers and websites. It has been an exciting journey and an amazing learning experience. I have worked with creative and dynamic editors, chefs, and writers from such publications as Bon Appetit, Sun-Sentinel (Tribune), Atlanta Constitution, Detroit Freepress, and the Fort Worth Star

In 1986 while working on my doctorate degree, I had the opportunity to conduct an independent study on nutrient analysis software. Those were the days when the operating system was DOS and the monitor was black and green. The purpose was to evaluate the pros and cons of nutrient analysis software. I learned early on recipes are written based on foods as purchased (AP) and in order to obtain a more accurate analysis the foods needed to be converted to the form an individual will consume; this is known as the edible portion (EP). The most accurate nutritional analysis is done in a laboratory and can be costly.

As I explored the Internet, I found numerous recipes without nutrition information, but even worse there were many recipes with inaccurate data. (Here is an example of a recipe I found with wrong information.)

Nutrition information is part of our everyday life. There are millions of people who depend on nutrition information to meet their dietary needs. Some of the diets include: low calorie, carbohydrate controlled, high protein, low protein, low fat, low cholesterol, low sodium, high fiber, gluten free, lactose free, and peanut allergies.

Why use a dietitian for nutritional analysis?

  • Recipes are usually written based on what the consumer needs to purchase. The individual analyzing the recipe must evaluate the recipe based on the actual food ready-to-eat (unless the food is meant to be eaten whole.)
  • A nutritional analysis program cannot cook or prepare meals. A person must have skills in Food Science, Culinary Arts, Nutrition, Cooking and Preparation Techniques, Purchasing Guides, Yield Factors, and Nutrient Analysis Software. Have you ever wondered how to analyze the following in a recipe? What foods would you choose from the database?

  1. A marinade you discard
  2. The salt when preparing pasta
  3. A pinch or handful
  4. 3 lb Chicken, directions: cook and remove skin and bone 
  5. Breading
  6. Apple, cored and peeled
  7. Alcohol in a heated dish

  • To own professional nutrition software with yearly maintenance fees can be expensive. In addition, there is the cost of an educated person to run the software. Updates are vital in our fast paced food industry with changing government regulations.
Consider adding nutritional analysis to your online recipes. A great service for the Recipe Blogger, Media, Cookbook Publishers, Writers, Chefs, and Recipe Websites. Your readers will benefit from the Nutrition information and a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist.

Take a short quiz to see if you have the knowledge and skills necessary to analyze a recipe? If not, contact Sandra Frank, EdD., RDN, LD at recipenews@gmail.com from Dietitians-Online.

Tuesday, December 10, 2013

Guest Blogger: Michelle Stewart, RD
Seven Foods and Five Drinks for a Very Merry Gluten-Free Holiday



7 Foods for a Very Merry Gluten-Free Holiday
1. Sugar cookies and Gingerbread men (made with GF flours: rice flour, potato starch, tapioca flour, and xanthan gum) 
  • Gluten-Free Flour Blend: To make flour blend, combine 2 cups rice flour, 2/3 cup potato starch, 1/3 cup tapioca flour and 1 teaspoon xanthan gum. Use appropria amount for recipe; store remainder in container with tight-fitting lid. Stir before using. 
2. Glazed Ham (toss out the glaze and make your own gluten-free glaze)

3. Quinoa, mushroom, or wild rice stuffing instead of traditional turkey stuffing

4. Meringue Cookies

5. Gravies thickened with cornstarch instead of flour

6. Gumbo with gluten-free Roux (made with sorghum flour instead of all-purpose flour)

7. Corn Bread (avoid store-bought mixes, and make it gluten free at home with gluten-free flour blend and gluten-free baking soda)
  • To make flour blend: combine 2 cups rice flour, 2/3 cup potato starch, 1/3 cup tapioca flour and 1 teaspoon xanthan gum. Use appropriate amount for recipe; store remainder in container with tight-fitting lid. Stir before using. 

5 Festive Gluten-Free Cocktails:
1. Homemade eggnog (warm or chilled)
2. Spiked Apple Cider
3. Rum Hot Toddy
4. Pomasa (Pomegranete juice and Champagne)
5. White Sangria

**Other alcohols that contain gluten:
Beer
Malted beverages

Guest Blogger: Michelle Stewart, MPH, RD, LD/N, CDE 

Michelle J. Stewart is a Registered and Licensed Dietitian and better known as The Nutrition Planner. Founder of Michelle Stewart Consulting & Associates who has been leading the way to a healthier you for more than 25 years. She is zealous when it comes to wellness from the inside out and empowering whomever she comes in contact with to take charge of their health and wellbeing. It is all about balance and moderation, her motto is “EAT LESS MOVE MORE”. Michelle is a Certified Diabetes Educator, and also holds certifications in Adult, Adolescent, and Childhood Obesity and is a Certified Wellness Coach. A Master’s In Public Health keeps her abreast of the latest health concerns and on the cutting edge of intervention. Focusing on aging and longevity with a holistic approach to living your best life is her pathway to inner peace and happiness.

An experienced and dynamic public speaker who specializes in the African American community, Ms. Stewart has participated in countless seminars and workshops all over the country. She was a panelist on health care topics at the African American Leadership Summit in Washington, D.C. where former Vice President Dick Cheney was the keynote speaker and the Healthy Breakfast keynote speaker at the annual National Newspapers Publishers Association convention in Chicago. 

Nutrition.gov News

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