Sunday, January 6, 2013

January 6,
National Bean Day

The nutrition information provided below is based on 1/2 cup cooked beans, prepared from dry beans. No salt has been added, therefore sodium levels are insignificant. Beans contain no cholesterol and a small amount of fat. Beans are a great source of fiber, high in potassium and contain many of the B vitamins. Beans also provide between 7% to 18% of one's daily iron needs.

All About Beans

The US Dry Bean Council (USDBC) is a private trade association comprised of leaders in the bean industry with the common goal of promoting the U.S. edible bean trade, both in the United States and abroad, and educating U.S. consumers about the benefits of beans. The USDBC gives a voice to the bean industry and provides information to consumers, health professionals, buyers, suppliers and the media about the good taste, nutritional value and versatility of beans.

The USDBC also is a resource for information on U.S. exporters, overseas importers, U.S. dry bean classes, trade policy issues and the role of U.S.-grown beans in international food-aid efforts. USDBC also publishes foreign language newsletters and other publications designed to help overseas importers, packagers and canners better understand and maintain contact with the U.S. dry bean exporting trade.

As part of USDBC’s mission, the organization collaborates with public health organizations, research centers, universities, and the entire supply chain, from seed suppliers to farmers, processors, wholesalers, distributors and transporters.

While the USDBC is privately funded, its representatives work closely with the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) in overseas markets, and often co-sponsors activities with the U.S. Government. These activities include hosting trade missions from foreign countries to visit U.S. production and processing facilities, participating in trade shows worldwide, coordinating trade missions of U.S. exporters and growers to visit overseas markets and producing education

The USDBC is headquartered in Washington, D.C., with a marketing office in Pierre, South Dakota. In addition, USDBC representatives around the world facilitate activities and dialog between U.S. and overseas trade.


Benefits
Unlike meat-based proteins, beans are naturally low in fat and are a cholesterol-free source of protein. Research shows that a diet including beans may reduce your risk of heart disease.

A nutrient-rich food, beans contain protein, complex carbohydrates, fiber, antioxidants, and important vitamins and minerals, such as folate, B-Vitamins, manganese, potassium and iron.

Folate, a vitamin very important for pregnant women and their unborn babies, is found in beans. During pregnancy, women need more folate. Expectant mothers who consume enough of the right nutrients can help reduce the risk of birth defects.

Beans are especially important for people with certain food allergies and intolerances. For example, some people can’t tolerate gluten, a natural protein present in wheat, barley and rye. Because beans don’t contain gluten, or major allergens found in various grains, substituting beans can help provide the fiber and other nutrients that people on restricted diets may be missing. Beans come in a variety of convenient forms (such as canned beans, bean flours and dehydrated beans) that can be used in place of allergenic and gluten-containing ingredients.

Bean Recipes
Black Bean Soup Garnished with
Green Onions

Black Bean Soup Garnished with Green Onions and
Reduced-fat Sour Cream Served in a Sourdough Roll






Friday, January 4, 2013

January 4, Trivia Day
Test Your Nutrient Analysis Skills


Answers below.

Many people believe if they just buy a nutrient analysis program, they can provide an accurate nutrition analysis. This is far from the truth.

Recipes are usually written based on what the consumer needs to purchase. The individual analyzing the recipe must evaluate the recipe based on the actual food ready to eat (unless the food is meant to be eaten whole.)

A nutrient analysis program cannot cook or prepare meals. A person must have skills in Food Science, Culinary Nutrition, Cooking and Preparation Techniques, Purchasing Guides, Yield Factors, and Nutrient Analysis Software.

An essential tool for analysis is the food conversion and equivalent tables. These databases provide information on AP (as purchased), EP (edible portion), waste, marinating, straining, percentage of bones, difference between raw or cooked weight, and comparison of weight versus volume measures. Many nutrient analysis software programs do not provide this information for all items; therefore it must be calculated manually or estimated. 

Most Americans believe one cup is equal to eight ounces; and they would be right if we were referring to a liquid. In selecting the correct measure of a food, it is critical to know whether the food is measured by weight or by volume. Weight measures include grams, ounces, and pounds. Volume measures are listed as teaspoons, tablespoons, fluid ounces, cups, pints, quarts, and gallons. 



Trivia Answers.
1a.  2.75 cups EP
1b.  3-4 medium apples or 113 grams
2.    4 cups all purpose flour
3.    6.5 cups cooked kidney beans 
4.    5 oz lobster meat
5.    4 cup shredded cheddar cheese

If you are looking for a registered dietitian knowledgeable in the science of nutrient calculations and analysis, contact: Dr. Sandra Frank at recipenews@gmail.com for a quote. 

Over 25 years experience providing nutrient analysis for the media, publishers, and chefs including the Tribune, Bon App├ętit, Atlanta Constitution, Detroit Free Press, and Fort Worth Star. Author of "Menu Solutions."

Wednesday, January 2, 2013

Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Press Release:
Make 2013 the Year You Achieve Weight Control Success

FOR RELEASE JANUARY 2, 2013 

Media contact: Ryan O’Malley, Allison MacMunn 
800/877-1600, ext. 4769, 4802 
media@eatright.org 



CHICAGO – Millions of Americans resolve to lose weight and eat healthfully at the beginning of each year, but resolutions are notoriously broken. Registered dietitians—the food and nutrition experts—weigh in on why resolutions fail and how to best set yourself up for success in 2013. 


“It may be tempting to focus on losing weight fast, leading many to turn to dangerous fads diets and crash diets,” said registered dietitian and Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics spokesperson Angela Ginn. “However, research shows that slow, healthy weight loss is more likely to last than dramatic weight changes.” 


While you should consult a physician before adopting an exercise plan, primary care physicians identify nutrition experts such as registered dietitians as the most qualified providers to care for obese patients, according to a recent study from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. 

“Forget about fad diets and work with a registered dietitian to get back to the basics with realistic and personal goals for eating smarter and moving more.”



Be realistic. Be specific. 

“Expecting to hit the gym for 4 hours every day or to stick to a super restrictive fad diet is overwhelming for your body, mind and schedule,” Ginn said. “Instead, choose smaller, healthy changes you can stick to over the long term, such as taking a walk during your lunch break or adding more fruits and vegetables to your plate each meal.”

“One large goal can seem overwhelming, so set yourself up for success with realistic goals, and divide large, vague goals into smaller, more specific goals,” she said.

For instance, rather than saying I will eat better, break this into specific goals like I will eat one more piece of fruit per day and I will choose whole grains more often.



“Goals should be challenging but also reachable,” Ginn said. “Consult a registered dietitian to build a plan with goals that works for your unique nutritional needs and fits with your lifestyle.” 

Also, make sure the goals you set are measurable so you can track your progress, Ginn recommends. For instance, choose goals so as “How much?” or “How many?” so you can easily review and track your progress, as well as reward yourself. These smaller goals will help keep you from getting discouraged because you can see results more quickly.”

Build a support network.

Enlist family and friends to try new healthy recipes with you or to be your workout buddy. Having a support network can help you focus on positive results rather than temptations, and motivate you to stick with your plan.
“A registered dietitian can also help you track your progress towards your health goals and give you encouragement and solutions along the way,” Ginn said. “It’s always a good idea to have a food and nutrition expert on your side!” 

Learn more about healthy weight loss by visiting www.eatright.org/healthyweight or watch the video What a Registered Dietitian Can Do for You




The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (formerly the American Dietetic Association) is the world’s largest organization of food and nutrition professionals. The Academy is committed to improving the nation’s health and advancing the profession of dietetics through research, education and advocacy. To locate a registered dietitian in your area, visit the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics at www.eatright.org.

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