Saturday, October 22, 2016

Eat Right with Colors

Music: The Wonderful World of Color, Walt Disney and Disney World.

Eat right with colors explores the health benefits associated with eating foods of many colors. Including color diversity in your meals and food choices enhances your intake of a wide range of nutrients. 

Red and Pink Foods
Apples, Beets, Cayenne, Cherries, Cranberries, Guava, Kidney Beans, Papaya, Pink Beans, Pink/Red Grapefruit, Pomegranates, Radicchio, Radishes, Raspberries, Red Bell Peppers, Red Cabbages, Red Chili Peppers, Red Corn, Red Currants, Red Grapes, Red Onions, Red Pears, Red Peppers, Red Plums, Red Potatoes, Red Tomatoes, Rhubarb, Strawberries, Tomatoes, Watermelons

Green Foods
Alfalfa, Artichokes, Arugula, Asparagus, Avocado, Bok Choy, Broccoli, Broccoli rabe, Brussels Sprouts, Celery, Chives, Collard Greens, Cucumbers, Dandelion Greens, Edamame, Endive, Fennel, Green apples, Green Beans, Green cabbage, Green Grapes, Green Olives, Green Onion, Green Pears, Green Peas, Green Pepper, Green Tomatoes, Honeydew, Kale, Kiwi, Leeks, Lettuce, Limes, Mint, Okra, Oregano, Parsley, Pistachios, Snow Peas, Spinach, Sugar snap peas, Swiss Chard, Tarragon, Tomatillo, Wasabi, Watercress, Zucchini

Blue and Purple Foods
Blue Grapes, Blue and Purple Potatoes, Blueberries, Dried Plums, Plums, Eggplant, Pomegranates, Elderberries, Juniper Berries, Kelp (Seaweed), Purple Belgian Endive, Purple Cabbage, Purple Figs

Yellow and Orange Foods
Apricots, Bananas, Butternut Squash, Cantaloupe, Carrots, Cheddar Cheese, Citrus Fruits, Clementines, Corn, Creamsicle, Garbanzo Beans, Golden Apples, Golden Flax Seed, Golden Raisins, Grapefruit, Honey, Lemon, Lemongrass, Mandarin Oranges, Mangoes, Nectarines, Orange Jello, Orange Peppers, Orange Tomatoes, Oranges, Papaya, Parsnips, Peaches, Pears, Persimmons, Pineapple, Pumpkin, Rutabagas, Saffron, Salmon, Spaghetti Squash, Squash Blossoms, Sweet Corn, Sweet Potatoes, Tangerines, Whole Grains, Yams, Yellow Apples, Yellow Beans, Yellow Peppers, Yellow Summer Squash, Yellow Wax Beans

White and Black Foods
White: Cauliflower, Coconut, Garlic, Ginger, Green Onions, Scallions, Horseradish, Jicama, Kohlrabi, Leeks, Millet, Mushrooms, Onions, Parsnips, Quinoa, Shallots, Soy Products, Sunflower Seeds, Tofu, Turnips, White Beans, White Corn, White Sesame Seeds

Black: Black Beans, Black Cherries, Black Currants, Black Mushrooms, Black Olives, Black Quinoa, Black Raspberry, Black Rice, Black Sesame Seeds, Black Soybeans, Blackberries, Boysenberries, Prunes, Raisins, Seaweeds, Tamari (Soy Sauce)

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Sandra Frank, Ed.D, RD, LDN
Jake Frank

Michelle Canazaro
John Gargiullo

October 22, National Nut Day

Nuts once considered a high fat, high calorie food is now being recognized as a Nutritious Snack with essential fatty acids, omega fats, protein and many vitamins and minerals.

Answers Below

Health Benefits of Nuts

How Nuts are Prepared

Recipes and Marketing Nuts
Planters Commercial

Oregon Hazelnut

Sharon Palmer, RD - Steel Cut Oats
Risotto with Walnuts

Resources and Answers
1. Peanuts
2. Cashews 
3. Walnuts 
6. Pecans
7. Macadamia
8. Almonds 

Friday, October 21, 2016

October 21, National Mammography Day - Remind a friend to have a Mammogram

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. October 21, National Mammography Day.
Remind a friend to have a Mammogram. Pass it Along.

Information obtained from the
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

A mammogram is an x-ray of the breast used to look for early signs of breast cancer. Regular mammograms are the best tests doctors have to find breast cancer early. When breast cancer is found early, many women go on to live long and healthy lives.

Women should have mammograms every two years from age 50 to 74 years; and more often if breast cancer runs in the family or you have any symptoms or changes in your breast.

To find out where you can get a mammogram, the CDC has provided the following resources.

1. If you have a regular doctor, talk to him or her. 
2. Call the National Cancer Institute's Cancer Information Service (CIS) at 1-800-4-CANCER (1-800-422-6237). For TTY: 1-800-332-8615. 
3. For Medicare information, you can call 1-800 MEDICARE (1-800-633-4227) or visit The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. 
4. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has a program called the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program,which works with health departments and other groups to provide low-cost or free mammograms to women who qualify. Find out if you qualify.

Thursday, October 20, 2016

October 20 World Osteoporosis Day
Love Your Bones: Protect Your Future

The National Osteoporosis Foundation (NOF) is the leading consumer and community-focused health organization dedicated to the prevention of osteoporosis and broken bones, the promotion of strong bones for life and the reduction of human suffering through programs of public and clinician awareness, education, advocacy and research. Established in 1984, NOF is the nation's leading voluntary health organization solely dedicated to osteoporosis and bone health.
The 2016 theme is Love Your Bones: Protect Your Future

Love Your Bones, Protect Your Future

Osteoporosis is a major public health threat for an estimated 44 million Americans. Of the 10 million American’s estimated to already have osteoporosis, eight million are women and two million are men. 

What can you do to protect your bones?
Osteoporosis and the broken bones it can cause are not part of normal aging. Osteoporosis prevention should begin in childhood and continue throughout life.
1. Get enough calcium and vitamin D and eat a well balanced diet.
2. Engage in regular exercise.
3. Eat foods that are good for bone health, such as fruits and vegetables.
4. Avoid smoking and limit alcohol to 2-3 drinks per day.

What Women Need to Know
Females are at a higher risk of developing osteoporosis and broken bones. 
• Of the estimated 10 million Americans with osteoporosis, about eight million or 80% are women.
• Approximately one in two women over age 50 will break a bone because of osteoporosis.
• A woman's risk of breaking a hip is equal to her combined risk of breast, uterine and ovarian cancer.
There are multiple reasons why women are more like to get osteoporosis than men, including:
• Women tend to have smaller, thinner bones than men.
• Estrogen, a hormone in women decreases sharply when women reach menopause, which can cause bone loss. This is why the chance of developing osteoporosis increases as women reach menopause.

Are You at Risk for Developing Osteoporosis?

Uncontrollable Risk Factors
•           Being over age 50.
•           Being Female.
•           Menopause.
•           Family History.
•           Low Body Weight/Being Small and Thin.
•           Broken Bones or Height Loss.
Controllable Risk Factors
•           Not Getting Enough Calcium and Vitamin D.
•           Not Eating Enough Fruits and Vegetables.
•           Getting Too Much Protein, Sodium and Caffeine.
•           Having an Inactive Lifestyle.
•           Smoking.
•           Drinking too much alcohol.
•           Losing Weight.
There are also medications and diseases that can cause bone loss and increase your risk of osteoporosis.

Calcium and Vitamin D 
Getting enough calcium and vitamin D are essential to building stronger, denser bones early in life and to keeping bones strong and healthy later in life. Calcium and vitamin D are the two most important nutrients for bone health.

Calcium-Rich Food Sources 
Dairy products, such as low-fat and non-fat milk, yogurt and cheese are high in calcium. Certain green vegetables and other foods contain calcium in smaller amounts. Some juices, breakfast foods, soymilk, cereals, snacks, and breads have calcium that has been added. 

Vitamin D Sources
There are three ways to get vitamin D:
• Sunlight 
• Food 
• Supplements 

Three Steps to Unbreakable Bones

You’re never too young or too old to improve the health of your bones. Osteoporosis prevention should begin in childhood. But it shouldn't stop there. Whatever your age, the habits you adopt now can affect your bone health for the rest of your life. Now is the time to take action.

Resources and References. To learn more about Osteoporosis, please visit the following Foundations.
World Osteoporosis Day
International Osteoporosis Foundation 

Wednesday, October 19, 2016

National Seafood Bisque Day - Healthy Crab Bisque

Crab Bisque
Yield: 8 servings
Serving Size: 3/4 cup

Cooking spray
1 1/4 cups thinly sliced shallots (about 4 large)
1 celery stalk, finely chopped (about 1/2 cup)
4 garlic cloves, minced
3 tablespoons vermouth
1 pound jumbo lump crabmeat, shell pieces removed and divided
3 cups fat-free milk
1 cup clam juice
1.5 ounces all-purpose flour (about 1/3 cup)
1/2 cup heavy whipping cream
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1/8 teaspoon ground red pepper
1 1/2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice

1. Heat a large Dutch oven over medium heat. Coat pan with cooking spray. Add shallots and celery to pan; cook 10 minutes or until softened, stirring occasionally. Add garlic; cook 1 minute. Stir in vermouth; cook 1 minute or until liquid evaporates. Add 8 ounces crabmeat.

2. Combine milk and clam juice in a large bowl. Weigh or lightly spoon flour into a dry measuring cup; level with a knife. Whisk flour into milk mixture; add to pan. Bring to a boil, stirring constantly. Cook 1 minute or until slightly thickened, stirring constantly.

3. Place half of milk mixture in blender. Remove center piece of blender lid (to allow steam to escape); secure blender lid on blender. Place a clean towel over opening in blender lid (to avoid splatters). Blend until smooth. Pour into a large bowl. Repeat procedure with remaining milk mixture. Return pureed mixture to pan. Stir in cream; cook over medium heat 3 minutes or until thoroughly heated.

4. Combine the remaining 8 ounces crabmeat, peppers, and lemon juice in a medium bowl. Top soup with the crabmeat mixture.

Tuesday, October 18, 2016

October 18, World Menopause Day
How to Avoid Menopausal Weight Gain

Every woman will go through the “change of life,” around 50 years of age plus or minus. This is the time of her last period (or menstruation). Symptoms of menopause vary with every woman. Common symptoms include hot flashes; night sweats; sleep irregularity; mood changes; and possible weight gain around the middle. Some women go through menopause without symptoms.

Due to a decrease in hormone levels and the aging process, many women find themselves gaining weight in their forties and fifties. There is a loss of muscle, which decreases the metabolism; and a gain of fat, mainly in the belly area. Lifestyle factors will play an important role in how you handle menopause. Menopausal women tend to be less active and eat more calories than they need.

Nutrition, Eating and
Wellness Guidelines for Menopause
  1. Maintain a healthy weight; it will decrease your risk of heart disease and other problems. 
  2. Meet your calcium and vitamin D needs. This is important to maintain healthy bones and prevent bone loss that may occur after menopause. Good food sources of calcium include dairy products, such as milk, yogurt and cheese; fortified soy and rice beverages; fortified juices; and canned fish with bones. Good food sources of vitamin D include milk, fortified soy and rice beverages, fortified juices, and fatty fish. 
  3. Be physically active every day. Physical activity helps maintain a healthy weight, keep bones strong and energy levels up, and decrease the risk of heart disease and other age-related complications.
  4. Some women will try soy and flax in food to help relieve the side effects of menopause. Currently, studies have not proven that soy and flax help.
  5. Wear lightweight and layered clothes. Body temperature fluctuates from hot to cold.
  6. Keep a cold glass of water by your side. Due to hot flashes and excessive sweating, it is important to stay hydrated.
  7. Relax.
  8. Take time to laugh.

How to Avoid Menopausal Weight Gain
You don't have to gain weight as a result of menopause.
Elizabeth Somer, RD explains how to avoid weight gain after menopause.

The Menopause Blues

I Will Not Age

Is It Hot In Here, Or Is It Me?

Resources and References

The International Menopause Society (IMS), in collaboration with the World Health Organization, has designated October 18 as World Menopause Day. To celebrate World Menopause Day, IMS is launching a new campaign to create awareness of understanding weight gain at menopause and the implications it can have on the future health of women in the post-menopausal period. 

For women aged 55–65 years, weight gain is one of their major health concerns and many are not aware of the health implications of excessive weight gain, particularly around the abdomen, which is associated with a heightened risk of cardiovascular and metabolic disease, and also impacts adversely on health-related quality of life and sexual function.
An educational toolkit of materials have been developed to support local country initiatives throughout the month of October to raise awareness of this potential health issue and many have been translated into key languages to ensure the campaign has a truly international perspective.

The IMS hopes that national societies will take the opportunity of World Menopause Day to highlight the increasing importance of menopausal health issues, by contacting the women of their country to encourage them to talk to their doctors about menopause and its long-term effects.

Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, Eating Right during Menopause

October 16-22, 2016 National Food Bank Week
How we can make a difference?

Resource. Feeding America

In many ways, America is the land of plenty. But for 1 in 6 people in the United States, hunger is a reality. Many people believe that the problems associated with hunger are confined to small pockets of society, certain areas of the country, or certain neighborhoods, but the reality is much different.

Right now, millions of Americans are struggling with hunger. These are often hard-working adults, children and seniors who simply cannot make ends meet and are forced to go without food for several meals, or even days.

It’s time to educate ourselves about the causes of hunger in America. 

Feeding America network of 200 food banks across the country are first-class organizations in the fight against hunger. They are more than just distribution centers, they are core to providing hope to the communities they serve.

The following is a summary of the information found on the Feeding America Website. 

Nearly 49 million people in America face hunger. That is 1 in 6 of the U.S. population – including more than 1 in 5 children. Don’t let their struggles go unheard. Join the Feeding America network of more than 200 food banks and Speak Out Against Hunger. 

Feeding America is the nation's leading domestic hunger-relief charity. Their mission is to feed America's hungry through a nationwide network of member food banks and engage our country in the fight to end hunger.

Feeding America provides emergency food assistance to an estimated 37 million low-income people annually, a 46 percent increase from 25 million since Hunger in America 2010.

Among members of Feeding America, 74 percent of pantries, 65 percent of kitchens, and 54 percent of shelters reported that there had been an increase since 2006 in the number of clients who come to their emergency food program sites.

Hunger can affect anyone. Feeding America has identified groups at risk, including young children, hunger in the suburbs, rural hunger, senior hunger, and the working poor.

Special on Childhood Hunger
Kate is a fictional character who represents the very situation in which many children find themselves when their parents lose their jobs. Find out how you can help.

Childhood hunger hinders a young person's ability to learn. They are more likely to suffer from poverty as an adult. Scientific evidence suggests that hungry children are less likely to become productive citizens. Insufficient nutrition puts children at risk for illness and weakens their immune system. The immature immune systems of young children, ages 0 – 5, make them especially vulnerable to nutritional deprivation and as a result, the ability to learn, grow, and fight infections is adversely affected.

Please find out how you can help during National Food Bank Week

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